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JULY/AUGUST 2016




DATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17, 2016 7:00 PM


PROGRAM: OUR TWO FAVORITE NURSES IN THE WORLD - JULIE WALTON AND NAOMI HARADA – ILEOSTOMY HYDRATION & OTHER OSTOMY SUBJECTS

REFRESHMENTS: JULIE WALTON


WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD

MEETING ROOMS A,B, & C, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS.



FROM THE PRESIDENT


The meeting at Kaiser Vacaville may have had a small audience, but it had a wealth of information from our speaker, Joy Leek, Hollister. The new products, which include ceramide are having fantastic results in both length of use and wound healing. Wound healing under the wafer has got to be one of the best announcements as of late. There were problems afterward as two of our members encountered when trying to place a phone order for samples. So please be patient with the Hollister or best yet, get the product number from your ET/CWOCN to order samples. And let us know what you think of the ceramide products. I will be ordering soon – I was unable to provide the block of time to tryout a new product.


Big suggestion on my part – when planning to try a new product - #1 – Plan for a timeframe that you are near to home for a week. #2 – Have no special functions to go to. #3 – And ONLY try ONE new product at a time. Example: If you order the 7760 Hollister wipes and a new wafer & pouching system, use the wipe the first week with your current wafer, then on the second application, if you had no problems with the wipe on the first week, use the wipe and new wafer in combination. Always use these cautionary steps and you will know what works, what doesn’t work and have no embarrassing situations.


Joy was a delight and so informative. She took the time to work with each ostomate, answer questions and listen to each of us. Joy is also our newest member of the Ostomy Assc. of Solano. I look forward to working in the future with Joy. She has been so kind to present to both our Vallejo and Vacaville groups in the past year.


The next VACAVILLE meeting will be September 21st. We need a volunteer for the REFRESHMENTS. It need not be elaborate, just something to nibble on during the break. Please call Rochelle – 447-0384 to be so sweet and volunteer. Our speaker will be the Vacaville Kaiser Nutritionist.


BIG THANKS go out to all our volunteers at the June 25th Cancer Survivors Celebration. Julie, Doug, Naomi, Rudy and Rochelle – we had a great time and added to our newsletter contacts. Most of all to hear the stories and see the smiles and determination of the attendees was terrific! We received a lovely thank you from the Planning Committee and Associate Medical Group Administator, Thea Giboney. Kaiser also had a wonderful, Q & A: The Doctor is In” during lunch (again a great spread to which we were invited). It made lunch even better to listen to the queries and the answers as all the docs worked well together in answers and comments from their different perspectives. And Julie’s bowls of goodies were a hit as usual. And we had great response about not only the candy, but the granola bars, too! All in all another wonderful experience and our little work group made it even more fun. If you are a Kaiser member, please watch for an announcement for the 2017 Celebration. It is well worth your time to register and come on down a Saturday of great booths and information.


Small note – After Joy’s Hollister presentation, I picked up some Ceramide cream to use on my skin right before my surgery and I got fab results on the crepe skin below my neck. Then after my jaw surgery, I had some skin that stiffened on my jaw & neck. I tried the Ceramide and both my surgeon and I were pleasantly surprised at how well it worked! If you are looking for Ceramide, I found mine at CVS – CeraVe. There are several lotions, creams & ointments within the CeraVe line, so look it over good before choosing. Not inexpensive, but not ridiculous either. And CVS has it on sale often.


MEMORY LAPSES

Via Oregon Ostomy Assoc.:UOAA Update September 2015

 

Part way through a sentence, your mind goes blank. You search frantically for the words, but memory fails. It can be one of the longest moments of your life. If those memory lapses seem to occur more and more often, it probably isn't what you think. Forgetfulness has been associated with mental loss due to Alzheimer's disease. But most people remain alert and able as they grow older. A minor decline in memory in healthy seniors is referred to as age-related memory loss (ARML). It's annoying, but ARML does not entirely disable memory.

 

How memory works is not a single process. Declarative memory is a source of actual information that includes vocabulary and life events. About one-third of healthy older people have some difficulty with declarative memory. This is ARML. ARML does not interfere with other important mental functions such as reasoning, imagination, insight and abstract thinking. Non-Declarative Memory allows us to recall skills and procedures. A person with dementia will have difficulty with both Non-Declarative and Declarative memory.

 

People with ARML and those with diseases such as Alzheimer's or other dementias have difference experiences. Normally, aging people may sometimes have trouble remembering words, doing daily activities on their own, remembering important events and conversations, and feeling as comfortable socially as they always have. In contrast, people in the early stages of dementia may have trouble recalling familiar words, neglect their safety, hygiene and nutrition, have difficulty driving and shopping and are unable to follow directions, become lost in familiar places. If you feel that these symptoms apply to you or someone you love, consult a doctor.

 

The best think you can do for your brain is to use it. A rusty memory can be salvaged. In one study, seniors who did mentally stimulating activities such as practicing music and playing board games reduced their risk of dementia. Evidence also suggests that aerobic exercise sharpens memory skills. Even believing in your ability to remember things may have some effect. When seniors were given a memory performance test, those who believed they would do well on the test did better than those who thought they would do poorly.

 

CONTROLLING ODOR

Via Metro Maryland: UOAA Update September 2015

 

A very important part of the new ostomate's rehabilitation is learning to control odor because it's important that the new ostomate feels good about himself and feels secure in relationships with others. The ostomate is extremely sensitive to odors and the reactions of those around him, especially family and friends. Colostomies tend to emit more odor than ileostomies because of the bacterial abundance in the colon.

 

Most sigmoid and descending colostomies are routinely irrigated so persistent odor is less of a problem than with the transverse colostomy whose semi-liquid drainage tends to be rather malodorous.

 

In ileostomates, almost continual peristaltic waves sweep the ileum and prevent stagnation of the intestinal contents, thereby eliminating the major cause of odor, i.e., bacterial growth. Extreme and persistent odor from an ileostomy could be an indication of a secondary problem, such a stricture or blockage which leads to stagnation, bacterial growth and subsequent odor.

 

Urine has a characteristic odor, but a foul odor could be a sign of infection, again from an overgrowth of bacteria. Certain foods will affect the odor of both feces and urine and the individual's elimination of the specific odor-producers will help. External and internal deodorants are available, but the two most important aspects in odor control are: good personal hygiene and meticulous appliance care.

 

For Fecal Ostomies:

  • Use odor proof pouches (or pouches with filters).

  • Change pouch immediately if leakage occurs.

  • Soak re-usable pouches and scrub inside with a brush.

  • Rinse open-ended pouches with cool water after emptying.

  • Place external deodorants in the pouch (such as deodorizing drops).

  • Eliminate eating odor-producers, such as cabbage, onions, fish, spicy foods and eat parsley and yogurt.

  • Internal deodorants are to be taken by mouth. Bismuth subgallate tablets help control odor internally by absorbing toxins. It also has a slight thickening effect on intestinal output making it especially useful to those with transverse colostomies or ileostomies. (Although it is available without a prescription, ostomates should consult a physician before taking.)



TIRED ALL THE TIME?

By Jeanne Seal, PhD: UOAA Updated September 2015

 

Food dramatically affects your well-being, whether you know it or not. It affects the way you feel physically, the way you respond emotionally and the way you perceive mentally. It lifts your energy resource or sends you plummeting into sleep and unconsciousness.

 

Most people are conscious about food when it has made them ill. The questions you need to be asking, is not 'Does it make  you sick?', but rather:

 

How well does it make you?

  • How much better do you feel after you've eaten?

  • How much energy, enthusiasm and passion for life do you experience after a meal or snack?

The key, when it comes to selecting food, is how do you feel after you have swallowed the food? How do you feel in five minutes, in an hour, or after several hours? Keeping a chart of what you eat will heighten your awareness tenfold, even if you think you know what the answers are without keeping a chart. Your own body can truly be counted on to tell you what you need, but the more attuned you are to your body and the better you care for it, the more this is the case.

 

One of the most amazing and delightful discoveries I've made, not only in relationship to fatigue, but also to hunger, has to do with breathing. Breathing deeply pacifies hunger, not in every situation, of course, or totally, but to a degree that never ceases to surprise me. Oxygen, like food, fuels the body and fresh clean air deeply breathed in serves a food-like function in that it assuages hunger while providing increased energy and a sense of well-being. Oxygen is probably a fuel source in which everyone who leads an urban life is deficient.

 

Laughter is another delightful habit that claims, relaxes and de-fatigues. A sense of humor and a ready laugh probably is more healing to the body and mind than anyone can know and any known medication. When you laugh, your perception shifts. You let go of feelings of judgment, blame and sense of pity to embrace a more extended knowledge of yourself and others. If you deliberately take the time to amuse and be amused, you will notice as your appraise your energy level that, while an hour ago you felt exhausted and too tired to move,, you feel awake, alert and invigorated.




SOMETHING FOR THE NEW OSTOMATE

(from Ostomy Spotlight, Oshkosh, Wisconsin Ostomy Support Group and “The Bud” Chippewa Valley Ostomy Association, Eau Claire, Wisconsin) September & October 2015


Don't forget, Rome was not built in a day. If changing your appliance seems to take forever, with practice it will soon become a small part of your normal day. “Waste disposal” for you once again will become a private matter. DO learn to take care of yourself from the start. You may not always have someone around to assist you. Come to ostomy meetings where you can talk to others about your problems. You'll be surprised at the ease with which you can discuss problems there. Bring your family members with you. It's also important to have them understand ostomy problems and solutions.


AGING AND THE OSTOMATE

UOAA Update

As we grow older, subtle changes occur in our bodies. Our skin loses elasticity and becomes thinner and dryer, thus becoming prone to wrinkles and irritation. These changes can become real problems for those who must wear a pouch all the time. To prevent leakage as the skin becomes more wrinkled, one should stand up straight when changing the pouch. With one hand, stretch the skin so it's tight, and with the other hand attach the barrier or one-piece pouch. Using a mirror ma help you see what you're doing.

ABDOMINAL NOISES

from UOAA Update Via Triangle, Pittsburgh Ostomy Society Newsletter &

The Bud, Chippewa Valley Ostomy Association


Abdominal noises happen! As ostomates, we wonder why and we are embarrassed. Any of the following may be the cause:

  1. You are hungry. Peristalsis goes on whether there is anything to move through or not. Empty guts growl. Eat a snack between meals, or consider four small meals a day.

  2. You are nervous, so peristalsis is increased. Try to slow down. Try to eliminate some stress (especially at meal times).

  3. Coffee and tea, cola and beer all stimulate peristalsis. Beverages consumed on an empty stomach will produce gurgles. Add a little bit of food with your beverages. Try some crackers or bread.

  4. Eating a high-fiber diet produces gas, so rumbles increase. Mix with other foods. Reduce amount of insoluble fiber. Switch to more soluble fiber.

  5. Intestines do not digest starches and sugars as easily as proteins and fats. Reduce the amount of carbohydrates that cause you trouble. Mix with proteins and fats.





The Uncontrolled Colostomy

Montreal, Canada & Ostoma News, CA

UOAA Update March 2015

Contra Costa News November 2015


Some people in the medical and nursing profssions are under the impression that people with colostomies have little difficulty in managing them, in comparison to people with ileostomies or ileal conduits. Very often a patient is told that in time, he can learn to train the bowel to evacuate once every 24 to 48 hours. This, they are told, can be achieved by both irrigation of the colon or by diet and then all that is required is a dressing over the colostomy or a piee of colostomy equipment if more protection in desired.

While the above situation is true in a large number of cases, there are those who find it an impossibility to regulate the bowel no matter what method they try. These people often become discouraged especially after hearing other colostomates report how well they manage with a minimum amount of care, with no problems at all.

Usually the person who had an irritable colon prior to surgery will experience problems post-op. Irrigations are recommended in these cases, to help regulate the colon. Persons in this category should consider being measured for a good appliance, one that will keep them clean, dry and odor free. This is a possible solution to this partiular problem at the present time.

Note: There are some cases where a large amount of the colon and or ileum (small bowel) has been removed. In that case, a colostomy can act more like an ileostomy, therefore cannot be controlled. Best to check it out with your doctor.



ILEOSTOMY ABSORPTION CONCERNS

UOAA Diet and Nutrition Care Guide, Edited by Bobbie Brewer, UOAA Update 11/12


Due to the absence of the colon and often altered trasit time through the small intestine, the type of medication taken must be carefully considered when prescribing for the person with an ileostomy. Medications in the form of coated tablets or time release capsules may not be absorbed and therefor, o benefit received. A large number of medications are prepared this way. Before the prescription is written, the patient with an ileostomy should inform the physician of his concern.

If the medication required is available only in a certain form and the coating would not be destroyed by the stomach juices, then the tablet may be crushed between two spoons and taken with water. (Note: check with your pharmacist to determine if the pill should be crushed).

The best type of medication for the person with an ileostomy if either in the form of uncoated tablets or in liquid form. Although these are not the most palatable treatments, these dosage forms ensure that the medication prescribed will be absorbed.

After ileostomy surgery, never take laxative. For a person who has an ileostomy, taking laxatives can cause a severe fluid and electrolyte imbalance.

Transit time varies with individuals. If food passes through undigested, be aware that this may be a sign that the nutrients are not being absorbed properly. Prolonged incidences of decreased absorption may lea to various subclinical or clinical nutritional deficiencies.


JUNE 2016



DATE: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2016 7:00PM


PROGRAM: HOLLISTER OSTOMY PRODUCTS

Joy Leek Representative


REFRESHMENTS: Volunteers Needed


WHERE: KAISER VACAVILLE, 1 QUALITY DRIVE

Conference Rooms 3 & 4, 1st Floor, West Entrance, MEDICAL OFFICES B


Park in lot C 4 or 5 on the East Ackerly Drive side of the new building. Use the West Entrance (facing the bldg. from Ackerly – near the left corner). The Conference rooms are on the first floor down the hallway on your right – past the restrooms on the left and before Area B18. Enter door #3.

FROM THE PRESIDENT


Our annual Potluck Birthday Party was a delicious endeavor! As usual, we have the best, inventive cooks in Solano. The chickens were rotisserie, the side dishes were delish, the devil made us do it to many desserts and the company superb. Thanks to all of you who partipated. And a HUGE THANK YOU TO JULIE for the chicken pick-up, the fun décor and the greatly appreciated take home boxes. The pre-dinner entertainment was the “chicken mash-up” So much fun to see the difference in the clean cutting skills of our surgical nurse and newest WOCN, Naomi and our wonderful CWOCN, Julie – well Julie we love you for so much more than your knife skills.


Also at the potluck, the group voted to grant $625 to the Youth Rally. This grant is the only donation that the Ostomy Association of Solano gives each year. This year’s grant will provide Registration, Lodging and Travel money for 1 “camper”. We are proud to say that we have continually supported the great efforts of the UOAA sponsored Youth Rally every year. Our Koins for Kids Kan collected your change at the meetings this past year. That and funds from our December Silent Auction made the bulk of the grant with additional funds coming from other donations. Your generosity will allow a child to join others this July in Seattle to find they’re not alone, to find support and medical attention and to understand that everyone has the same opportunities to achieve their goals regardless of medical or physical differences. Reading the thank you notes we receive after each rally really tug your heart strings. These kids forge lifelong friendships and many come back after they reach the max age of 17 to become counselors themselves to a new group of children. Thank you for all your support. You really make the difference!


Rochelle surprised everyone with a party favor – a laminated UOAA Travel Card. Those of you who attend the June 15th Vacaville meeting will possibly luck out with one, too. Our speaker is Joy Leek from Hollister Ostomy Products. Hollister is always one of our more attended meetings as the product line is superb and so many of us use one or more of them. Newest goodies, samples and tips will be the menu for the night. Please make Joy welcome and help yourself to great information by planning to attend. If you are unable to attend this meeting or if you missed the April meeting, checkout the summary of the Travel and TSA information and tips in this newsletter. You can download the UOAA travel card at www.ostomy.org, but the laminator is at Rochelle’s house, sorry.


Remember – NO JULY MEETING. Enjoy the kids, grandkids, great-grandkids and fun travel. We will see you on August 17th at Kaiser Vallejo. Our next Vacaville meeting will be on September 21st. Mark the calendar as both will have great speakers.


Again, Have a Fun and Safe Summer – Rochelle.


Kaiser Cancer Survivors Celebration June 25th 10:30 – 2 Kaiser Vallejo

Thank you for your response. We have enough to cover each segment, however we can always use more to help answer questions and give others a break. Lunch is included. Candy and granola bars at our table. Call Rochelle if you can help. Did I mention? Lunch is included with candy and granola bars at our table! Did I ask? Call Rochelle.

Relay for Life – Solano & Yolo Counties


Vacaville – June 25, Winters – July 9, Fairfield – July 16, Vallejo – Aug. 6 and Benicia – Aug. 19


Ostomy Travel Tips 2016

By Rochelle Stacey, the Solano Ostomy News, Updated June 2016


TSA & longs lines are not the only challenges an ostomates incurs when traveling. Preparation is the most important part of travel for those of us with that “extra baggage” we carry 24/7. Whether by car or plane, plan ahead and an enjoyable trip is yours.


Go to www.ostomy.org and check out the Ostomy Travel Tips there. You’ll find lots of info about preplanning, TSA and a copy of the UOAA Travel Communication Card.

Preplan Check-list - Devise your own to include:


Number of wafers, pouches, wipes and all other skin prep products – Track your current number of daily/weekly pouch changes. Multiply that by the number of days/weeks traveling and most important, MULTIPLY that by 2 or 3. That way you are prepared for the unexpected. There will not be a corner pharmacy to pick up that emergency item you need. Factor in climate, sports (exercise may decrease the wear-time of a wafer or you may prefer a shorter/closed-end pouch or support belt for these activities), tour restrictions or flight plans may need earlier change date than needed, or should you get stranded. Pre-cut and repackage your wafers. Carry opaque bags for product disposal (a nice consideration for maids and discreet for that emergency change in a public toilet). One of our members – going for an extended family visit, had her next supply shipment sent there directly. Do plan your travels to include time for an appliance change right before leaving and for your return.

By AIR:

Make sure you read all TSA information at www.TSA.gov – cover all general information and go into the site under Disability where you fill find Disabilities and Medical Conditions, Medications and Colorectal Awareness.

You may consider TSA Pre-Check at $85 for 5 years. This will NOT avoid screening, but will get you into a shorter line. Pre-Check 1. Online application or at an application center. 2. Schedule an appointment (855-347-8371) or in Solano County there is an office in Fairfield! 421 Executive Court, N (800) 315-4507.


Empty your pouch right before entry in line. Always carry your supplies with you. Only if you cannot pack all in your carry-on, then only then pack those extra amounts of backup product in checked luggage that absolutely will not fit. I carry it all in one bag all in clear plastic containers and declare with my UOAA Travel Communication Card at the TSA check-in.


I inform the TSA agent that I have an external medical device and will separate my medical supplies in a second tub from my 3-1-1 bag & shoes. Some people find it easy to have a photocopy of medical a medical brochure listing with pictures of what wafers, pouches and medical appliances they carry look like to show and explain. I ask if they just want to wand me rather than the scan as they’ll want to wand me anyway. You may then be given a glove to wipe your clothing in the stoma area to be tested for explosive residue – YOU WILL wipe yourself. No TSA agent is to touch your stoma nor do the wipe down. If this is “required” or if any time you feel you are not being treated properly, it is ALWAYS you right to stop the screening at any time and ask for a supervisor or a private setting. This will not “trigger any alarms” nor cause you to be singled out. Passengers with an ostomy will never be asked to display or empty a pouch or appliance. Cooperate but know your rights, but most of all be prepared in how you pack, how you politely ask for screening concerns and always smile and be pleasant. Trust me, the agents don’t see much of that and it will be a ticket to a smooth screening.


By Car – Yours or a Rental during your trip:


Pre-plan by using the check-list suggestions above. Winter or summer – carry your wafers in a cooler. Utilize a water-proof bag that is sturdy and easily located. Make sure your seat belt is not resting on your abdomen or stoma. I have a seat belt clip on belts in our cars and in my luggage for rentals. This allows the pressure on the shoulder to be relieved (especially for those of us who are short of stature) and does not interfere with the safety operation of the seat belt. These are sold under many names in magazines – but check your local car washes first. A lot carry some sort of belt clip. One of our members uses Stoma Gard – a low profile plastic guard (www.sto-med.com).


Documentation to carry with you – of course, passport, tickets etc., however you may consider adding:


Insurance card – Before you leave find out how to access medical aid abroad, Mexico and Canada, too.


Have your Operation Report (available from your operation hospital). If you should need an emergency medical procedure, this information could be vital to the doctors.


Make a list of all medical supplies with codes and order information. Have a list of all medications with prescription number and pharmacy information.


Travel Insurance – carefully check for any exclusions such as pre-existing medical conditions. Confer with your travel agent.


If you wear glasses, have your prescription or preferably a second pair.


Take only those credit cards needed and have a copy front and back for contact info if stolen/lost.


Have a list of emergency contacts.


No matter how you travel, keep these thoughts in mind:

Stay hydrated!

Enjoy the area cuisine, however be mindful of how different foods and spices may affect your digestive system. Ileostomy & colostomy need to be careful of blockage. Urostomy be mindful of indications of a urinary infection.

And most of have a great time! Preparation will ease your mind and spirit so you can enjoy!




NEED A CALCIUM SUPPLEMENT?--WHAT SHOULD YOU LOOK FOR?

Reprinted from Re-Route, Evansville Ostomy News and Contra Costomy News August 2015


Calcium is essential not only for bone but proper functioning of muscle and other organs. The body controls blood levels of calcium tightly to maintain function, which means calcium will be pulled from bone to make up any deficit of calcium intake. The loss of bone density is the major reason for recommending calcium supplementation to assure adequate intake. The body absorbs calcium in two ways. Actively, which requires vitamin D and passively, by diffusion into cells lining the intestinal tract. So, besides taking in adequate calcium (about 100mg per day, more for teens and those over 50), it is important to take in vitamin D. The current Daily Value for vitamin D is 400 International Units (IU), but recent research on blood levels of vitamin D and calcium absorption suggest this is too low and also that a significant percentage of people have vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Vitamin D is contained in many vitamin products and some calcium supplements also provide vitamin D. Several different calcium compounds are used in over the counter supplements. The most common are calcium gluconate, calcium citrate, calcium carbonate and tri and dicalcium phosphate.

Calcium gluconate has the lowest % of calcium by weight (9%), so it takes more, about 4 times as much, to get the same among of calcium as from carbonate or phosphate forms. That can mean more or bigger tables to get the DV of calcium.

Calcium citrate is about 21% calcium. The best know brand is Citracal and this brand is available as an effervescent tablet. The citrate form if more soluble in water than other forms, which make it easier to make as an effervescent. Solubility in water is not the same as absorption and data on absorption of citrate versus other forms is conflicting. Some studies showed absorption of calcium from all forms tested and non-significant differences among the forms.

Calcium carbonate is the most frequently used because it is low in cost and abundant. One source is oyster shell and one brand is actually named Os-Cal, for oyster shell calcium. The carbonate form, like phosphates, has a higher % of calcium (about 40%) than gluconate or citrate forms. Another well known brand of calcium carbonate is Tums, which is a chewable tablet marked as an antacid. A disadvantage of carbonate forms is that CO2 gas is a byproduct of the antacid action. Excess gas can be a source of bloating and pain.

Tri- and dicalcium phosphate have about 40% calcium by weight and do not create gas. Calcium and phosphate are the two major minerals in bone, so this form provides both phosphorous and calcium (individuals with advanced kidney insufficiency may retain phosphorous and should not take phosphorous containing supplements without consulting a physician). Two brands of calcium phosphate are Posture (tricalcium phosphate) and Forbones (dicalcium phosphate). Forbones includes vitamin D in its formula.

Forbones is made by the same manufacturer as FORVIA, which contains vitamin D and the same dicalcium phosphate form. One advantage of the two products is that the vitamin D is present in water-miscible rather than oily form, easier to absorb for people who may have difficulty in digesting fats and oils. Which is the right one for you? Consider how much calcium you and your doctor feel you should be taking daily because products with less than a400 mg of calcium per table may mean taking a handful to get up to 100 or 1200mg per day. Next, pick something you can swallow. It it's too darn big to get down comfortably, you're probably not going to stick to taking your calcium regulary and if one form of calcium seems to disagree with you try another. There are choices available.

Sources for this article: Drug Facts and Comparisons; “Vitamin D Deficiency” N. Engl J Med 2007;357:266-81: “Acute changes in serum calcium induced by oral intake of five currently available calcium salts” Clinical Rheumatology 1997; 16-3:249-253; Forbones and FORVIA product literature.



LAUGHTER—AN ESSENTIAL INGREDIENT OF GOOD HEALTH

UOAA Update 10/2013


For years, Readers Digest has featured the column “Laughter, the Best Medicine”. It contains jokes, riddles and humorous musings designed to tickle the funny bone. But just how important in laughter to our everyday health?

It turns out when we laugh we produce natural killer cells which destroy tumors and viruses. Plus there's an increase in the production of Gamma-interferon (disease-fighting protein), T-cells (important for our immune system) and B-cells (which make disease-fighting antibodies). Besides lowering blood pressure, laughter increases oxygen in the blood, which also facilitates healing.

Laughter helps us to deal with stress, cope with loss work through tragedy, hide our embarrassment and calm our fears. Laughter helps the body relax. It lowers blood pressure, increases immune system functioning and assists in warding off disease.

In terms of mental health, laughter:

  • Helps us connect with others. Humor is often used as a means to help us collectively cope with grief, fear or loss.

  • Makes us more productive. Happy people have more energy.

  • Releases negative emotions such as anger, fear, sadness, resentment and depression. Increases the likelihood that we will feel happy.

  • Releases endorphins in the brain that help you feel good.

Did you also know that laughter is a form of aerobic exercise? You may even feel fatigued if you laugh continuously for nay length of time. Just remind yourself to laugh well and often in order to experience the aerobic benefits of laughter.

What steps can you take to increase the amount of laughter in your life?

Surround yourself with positive upbeat people who laugh a lot. Laughter is contagious.

Find out what makes you laugh. Is it funny movies, watching the comedy channel, reading funny material? Whatever it is, do it more often.

Don't take yourself, anyone else or even life for that matter, so seriously.

Always remember, happiness if your birthright...so laugh and when you do, laugh loud and often.


REDUCING YOUR RISK OF PNEUMONIA

UOAA Update September 2015

 

Although certain organisms are more contagious than others, it is unusual to "catch" pneumonia from someone else. You usually develop pneumonia because your own immunity is weakened.

 

To fortify your natural resistance to pneumonia - get vaccinated. Because pneumonia can be a complication of the flu, getting a yearly flu shot is a good way to prevent pneumonia at least once after the age of 65 or if your doctor recommends it sooner due to your condition.

 

To help reduce your changes of pneumonia, do the following:

  • Wash your hands. Your hands come into contact with germs on a daily basis that can cause pneumonia. Wash your hands frequently to decrease your exposure.

  • Do not smoke. Smoking damages your lungs' natural defenses against respiratory infections.

  • Take care of yourself. Proper rest, diet and moderate exercise can help keep your immune system strong.

Although most cases of pneumonia do not prove fatal, you do not want to mistake pneumonia for a cold or flu and leave it untreated.



APRIL 2016

DATE: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 2016 7:00PM

PROGRAM: TRAVELING WITH AN OSTOMY, ROCHELLE STACEY

REFRESHMENTS: NAOMI H.

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD

MEETING ROOMS A,B, & C, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS.

SAVE THE DATE: MAY 18, 2016 VALLEJO KAISER - BIRTHDAY POTLUCK

JUNE 15, 2016 VACAVILLE KAISER - HOLLISTER REP.


FROM THE PRESIDENT

We had a full house for our March meeting in Vallejo. It was very well received and I’m still getting such positive remarks from those who attended. Many thanks to the officers of the Vallejo Police Department who gave us an excellent presentation on Senior Safety and Current Scams. Officer Garcia from Community Services indicated the most important point for unwanted phone solicitations and scams – DO NOT ANSWER! Even with Caller ID you must be diligent. That 707 number is probably a solicitor or worse a scam artist. If it is a legitimate friend or business you deal with, they will leave a message. Most people are used to being picked up during the out-going message as this is a common practice to monitor calls nowadays. Officer Sanchez who is the Real Estate Scam investigator for the Solano County District Attorney had multiple real estate scam stories. Again those solicitors are targeting our seniors. They have access to an unbelievable amount of personal information on anyone with a small annual fee. Your address, phone #, age, marital status, income, mortgage and even the names of your relatives is there for the taking. So much senior fraud is aimed at the age group 60’s – 90’s. And so many of these calls are not the phone number you see (any number can be edited into the caller ID notice). A huge percentile is out of country – Russia, Jamaica, Africa & Canada. Home invasion robberies have increased in daytime hours. If you work or travel, another neat item is the “Smart Doorbell” (available at places like Home Depot, Lowes, etc). If someone rings your doorbell, it goes to your cell phone and acts as a speaker to the ringer and will record the conversation. Great tool for you make the “bad guy” or even the delivery person, think you’re inside the house giving them directions –“ leave it on the porch. I’ll get it in few minutes”. Another great ploy to use for the woman in the house alone. Door bell rings – “We can’t get to the door right now, my husband is cooking and I can’t catch the dog.” Now you have a husband and a dog in the house to scare off the intruder. Don’t leave your garage door up and open for any length of time when alone at home. That bad guy may have followed you home from the store.

Don’t be paranoid. Just be smart, alert and prepared. The Vallejo Police department is having a “Business Watch” seminar on April 11th at 6PM at the Empress on Virginia St.. You can go as an individual – no business connection needed – to get more ways to protect yourself, your family and your property. Call in advance to reserve a spot, 707-553-5321 or you can just show up that night and tell them “Garcia invited me”.

Again, they were so informative and humorous. If you missed their presentation to our group, please consider going to the Empress on April 11th.

If you plan to travel this summer, please come to our April 20th meeting. I will have some tips and the UOAA travel cards, plus I will have some more of the police tips for you. Please bring tips to share with your other ostomy travelers. Also, make note of the dates and locations of the next meetings on the front page. FOOD & FUN – MAY & JUNE. Rochelle

The chart below contains Solano County and National Suppliers that have been recommended by members of the OAS and was edited by Rochelle Stacey. If you have any questions or additions, please contact Rochelle.

Ostomy Products Manufacturers & Suppliers

Information, Orders and Free Samples Ostomy Association of Solano

Local Solano & Sacramento

 

Updated March 2016

Jackson Medical Supply

707-446-7014

Vacaville

 

707-644-4170

Vallejo

 

530-661-7409

Woodland

Professional Village Pharmacy

800-710-9881

Sacramento

Bacon East Pharmacy

925-687-0565

Concord www.baconeast.com

National



AOS

800-858-5858

Supplier

Bard

800-526-4930

Supplier

Bruce

800-225-8446

Supplier

Byram

877-902-9726

Supplier

C & M Ostomy Supplies

954-234-7120

Stoma Cup & Dry Pro

C & S Pouch Covers

877-754-9913

Manufacturer

Celebration

413-539-7704

Stoma Guard Belt

Choice

800-213-0890

Supplier

Coloplast

800-237-4555

Manufacturer

Convatec

800-422-8811

Manufacturer

Cymed

800-582-0707

Manufacturer

Edgepark Surgical

800-321-0591

Supplier

Fox

877-369-3699

Supplier

Hollister

800-323-4060

Manufacturer (has great free DVD)

Marlen

216-292-7060

Manufacturer

Nu-Hope

800-899-5017

Mfr & Great Hole cutter, Precut pink tape

Options

800-737-7675

Manufacturer

ostomysecrects

877-613-6246

Underwear & Wraps

Parthenon

800-453-8898

Supplier

Safe n Simple

844-767-6334

Cleanser Wipes, etc

Shield Healthcare

800-228-7150

Supplier

Stoma Guard

800-814-4195

Seatbelt / other protectors

3-M

800-342-4357

Tape & Cavilon products

Torbot

800-545-4254

Bonding Cement, Stoma Care Wipes, etc

Some ABCs of Urostomy Care
From OSTOMY OUTLOOK, Ostomy Association of North Central Oklahoma, September, 2015, Editor: Bob Baumel ,
via Philadelphia Newsletter and UOAA Update May 2015


Adherence: Urinary appliances adhere well with cement Stomahesive® and Colly-Seel™. The urinary
stoma drains continuously. The urine may be mildly irritating to the skin and may be odorous.
Bleeding: Often blood is noted in the appliance and its origin isn’t immediately clear. One source may beirritation of the stoma by uric acid crystals. These can be formed in the appliance or on the skin around the stoma if the faceplate opening is too large. This may be indicated by small white spots on the stoma upon removal of the appliance. The crystals have an abrasive effect on the stoma. The crystals may be readily dissolved and the bleeding relieved by bathing the stoma and the surrounding area with a half-strength vinegar solution. Do this 3 or 4 times a day while the appliance is being worn.
Changing Appliances: The best time to change a urinary appliance is usually in the morning before
drinking anything.
Closed Bottom: Only drainable pouches should be used on urinary stomas. Closed bottom pouches
should never be used.
Face Plate: A convex face plate may be extremely useful with a flush urinary stoma.
Fluid Intake: Two to three liters (quarts) of fluid daily provide adequate “traffic” through the urinary system prevent an increase in bacterial growth. (This can occur in a slow moving system.) Increased bacterial growth may lead to urinary tract infection.
Leaking: Urinary pouches that are allowed to get too full will tend to leak. Connecting the pouch to a leg bag will be helpful if you’re unable to empty often enough. Attach the strap of the leg bag loosely to allow good blood circulation.
Night Drainage: A bedside drainage bag or bottle, probably similar to the type you used in the hospital, may be used for children and adults. This is how you can avoid getting up during the night to empty the pouch. The average urinary pouch won’t hold the amount of urine that may be excreted during the night.
Odor: Drinking cranberry juice is helpful in deodorizing urine.
Plugging: You should NEVER use anything to plug your stoma while cleaning, changing or emptying your bag. This could cause problems with your stoma.

Ostomy Myth 13 –Leaks
(Ostomy Myth Series by Barbara Skoglund,

via “The New Outlook”, April 2013, UOAChicago


I saw a puzzling post one day on the alt.support.ostomy newsgroup. The poster asked, "Other than
leaks, what problems do you have?" Everyone, me included, seems to presuppose that all ostomies leak. Well folks, I hate to burst your bubble, but it is a rare occurrence for a pouching system to leak!
I cannot say I have never had an accident. I have had four in the nearly two years I have had my
ileostomy. Three of the four was during a brief period of madness where I decided I knew better than my WOC nurse, and I ordered a bunch of sample pouching systems to try. I had heard all about the wonders of the two piece pouching systems, so I wanted some Tupperware of my own.
Lo and behold, they leaked on me. They just are not built for my body shape. I also tried skin barriers
that did not have convexity. Guess they did not suit me correctly either. If I had stuck to what my WOC nurse prescribed, I would never have had these leaks.
Now I stick with what works. The fourth accident was not due to failure of the skin barrier or pouch, but rather due to my own stupidity! I lifted a heavy suitcase, leaned it against my abdomen, and let it slide down my body onto the bed. The suitcase became hooked onto my pouch clip, and snapped it open. If you have an ostomy, it is not a good idea to slide heavy objects down your tummy. It can lead to a messy situation.
So, all four of my accidents were of my own doing. If I had stuck with what my very competent WOC
nurses told me would work for me, and if I had not been silly enough to slide a suitcase down myself, I could say with confidence . . . I have never had a leak.
What if I obtained a leak again? I would deal with it. Two of the four accidents I had were at home and
two were not. Actually, the first one took place at Murphy's Landing, a recreation of a 19th century farming village, over an hour from my home. Luckily that had a bathroom with running water, but it sure was not private. I had to stand before a sink in a public restroom and change my pouching system in a bathroom filled with other people. I did it. I know I could do it again. So, I do carry my emergency kit, but I have not had to use it once since I decided to stick with the pouching system that was prescribed for me.
Whenever I see people with ostomies post about leaks the first thing I ask is, "When is the last time you
were fitted by a WOC nurse?" They always respond, “Never.” or “Years ago.” Phone your WOC nurse for an appointment and make sure you are using properly fitted pouching systems for your exact body configuration and ostomy supplies.




IS IT HEARING TEST TIME?

UOAA Update July 2015 

Do crowds make you grumpy? Do you avoid noisy restaurants, even when the food is great? Are you beginning to suspect that there's a widespread mumbling conspiracy afoot?

You may be suffering from an invisible disability that's the third most common health problem in the United States, afflicting 30 percent of adults ages 65 and up. It's hearing loss, and many people don't even suspect they have it.

Most hearing loss is due to aging, with the condition developing so slowly that many people don't notice for quite some time. In fact, most people wait from seven to ten years to seek help. Other causes of hearing loss besides aging include excessive exposure to loud noises, trauma, ear infections and genetics.

To see if you might be one of the 28 million Americans suffering from hearing loss, ask yourself if any of the following situations apply to you on a regular basis. If so, consider seeing an audiologist for a hearing test.

  • You miss a social event because you misunderstood the place or time.

  • You'd rather sit at home and watch reruns than go to a party because parties are noisy and conversations at such events can be challenging.

  • You're constantly feuding with family members because they turn the television and stereo down way too low.

  • Whenever someone speaks at a public event, you have to ask others what was said.

  • You find men's voices easier to understand than women's.

  • You try to avoid talking on the phone because the sound quality isn't what it used to be.

For more information on hearing loss, contact the American Academy of Audiology at 1-800-222-2336 or find them on the internet at  www.audiology.org.



SUCCESSFUL AGING

By Grace Lynch: UOAA Update July 2015

Images of older people pumping iron, teaching kids to read, building homes for the homeless, surfing the net and tap dancing are abound in the media today. Whether they're selling vitamins or vacations, today's images of older people are a welcome substitute for stereotypes of the past. The images have changed because the realities have changed.

Today's older people are, in fact, nothing like their parents and grandparents.  For one thing, they are living a lot longer. The life expectancy for people age 65 and over is 17.4years. Compare this with the beginning of the century when the average life span was only 47.

While policy experts once worried that this gift of time would be marred by illness and disability, recent research reveals a gradual decline in chronic disease and disability. The number of people with high blood pressure, arthritis and emphysema has shown an unexpected and steady decline since 1982 and overall, according the the national Long-Term Care Survey, there has been a 15% drop in disability. Never before in history have so many older people had the opportunity to live so long and so well.

 

VITAMIN D HELPS ELDERLY AVOID FRACTURES

UOAA Update July 2015 

Preventing broken bones as you age could be as easy as popping a vitamin D pill just three times a year. It's especially important to prevent bone thinning and fractures in the elderly. In fact, breaking the hip can even cause death in many elderly people -- due to an in crease in pneumonia or blood clots from being immobilized in bed. Prior studies have shown that a combination of vitamin D and calcium can reduce fractures. But researchers in a study wanted to see if vitamin D alone would have the same effect.

The study is published in the March 2009 issue of the British Medical Journal. Researchers studied more than 2,500 people ages 65 to 85. Each took 100,000 IV of vitamin D -- a high dose compared with the normal dose of 400 IU -- or a placebo every four months. People who took vitamin D were 22% less likely to have a fracture during the five-year study. They were also 33% less likely to have a fracture in areas of the body that are commonly affected by osteoporosis (hip, wrist, forearm, and vertebrae). There were no side effects of vitamin D and the cost is minimal.

If future research confirms that vitamin D is effective at preventing fractures, even when taken only a few times a year -- this could be a welcome addition to staving off osteoporosis and the potentially serious health effects of this disease.

Steps on how to obtain ostomy products for the uninsured
or underinsured ostomates
By Linda Rahuba, BSN, RN, COCN
Pittsburgh Ostomy Society

For those of you without coverage for ostomy supplies or who need more products each month than the
insurance company will cover, here are some suggestions on how to get the ostomy products your require.
1. Contact your local hospital to see if the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurse (WOCN) or ostomy nurse has any suggestions for you or can provide any supplies until you can get the products from another source.
2. Contact the manufacturer of your ostomy products to see if they can provide products for you. Please note that if a manufacturer sends out ostomy supplies, with the exception of Hollister’s Ostomy Assistance Program described in the following paragraph, the products will most like only be provided to you for a short timeframe, possibly only a one-time shipment. Contact ConvaTec at 1/800/422-8811 or Coloplast at 1/888/726-7872.
3. Hollister has an ostomy assistance program under which you can apply for ostomy products by following the steps below. Please note that only the person requiring the ostomy products can make the call to Hollister (but perhaps a family member can call for you); a WOCN cannot call on your behalf.
Contact Hollister at 1/888/740-8999. Tell the customer service agent that you want to apply to the patient assistance program. The agent will walk you through each step.
i. Provide the agent with information about the type of ostomy you have: Colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy or perhaps you have a double.
ii. Size of your ostomy/ostomies. If you don’t know for certain, give them a rough estimate of the size so you get the appropriately sized product to fit your stoma.
iii One– or a two-piece pouching system.
iv. Drainable or closed-end pouch.
v. Transparent or opaque pouch (the opaque pouch is the one that you cannot see through).
vi. Any accessory products you require, such as powder, paste, barrier rings, adhesive removal wipes, skin barrier wipes or ostomy belts.
vii Whether you require a convex product.
You will need to reapply every 6 months for this program.

You will get samples of ostomy products with your application to the program.
4. Contact the Osto Group, an affiliate of Wholeness House, a non-profit organization that has been serving ostomates around the country. Osto Group accepts donations of unused products and provides them free of charge to people without health insurance or those who are not covered for durable medical equipment into which ostomy products fall (note—they are only able to provide those products donated to them). The only cost to those receiving supplies is for the shipping and handling. You can request ostomy products online 24 hours a day, 365 days a year at ostogroup.org, or you can call them toll-free at 1/877/678-6690. Their warehouse is open Monday through Thursday from 9 AM-4 PM ET and Friday from 9 AM—Noon ET. Osto Group asks that you order only two months’ worth of ostomy supplies at a time. Since the products you will receive were donated, be aware that they may be older products, which may not last as long as those provided to you from a medical supply company or
manufacturer.
If you do not have coverage or your coverage for ostomy supplies is limited, you can attempt the above steps to get the products you need. Those who have the resources or with medical coverage are reminded to please order their supplies as usual so these assistance programs are available for those truly in need.
Editor’s Note: Medicare recipients may request additional supplies as long as their doctor can provide a sound medical reason (skin issues, location, etc.) along with the prescription.
Thanks to The Triangle, Pittsburgh Ostomy Society


THE MOST POWERFUL PRESCRIPTION

2/2014 UOAA Update and Contra Costomy News 2015

A positive attitude toward negative situations is one of the most powerful forces in the world. It not only affects how we respond to hardships and difficulties, it can actually help to change the outcome. The can be seen firsthand in many ostomates and other people who have overcome potentially devastating diseases and go on to lead full, productive, happy lives.

The physical aspect of life may be compromised greatly by illness or surgery, but with a positive mental attitude and a willingness to let go of self-pity and bitterness, life goes on and can even be enriched by a painful traumatic experience.


IMPROVISING...OR FIXING A LEAK IN A HURRY

Via: The Right Connection & Southern Nevada's Town Karaya and Evansville Newsletter

UOAA Update September 2015 

If you happen to spring a leak, especially when away from home, it can be a cause of panic. Being prepared can help you keep your cool. Wearing an appliance cover can provide extra protection. One person noted that when they had a leak near the seal, he was able to stuff several folded tissues between the pouch and the cover. This absorbed the leakage and kept him going for 90 minutes until he was able to get back home and change.

Also, a pouch cover has the advantage of soaking up perspiration on a hot day. Perspiration can quickly undermine the best adhesives. A good ostomy powder can help soak up moisture too. Lacking this, corn starch or baby powder is equally effective.

Some people carry Band-Aids with them which can be used to mend a small tear in the pouch. Some say that it works so well, they forget about the makeshift repair until their regular time to change pouches! You may want to keep individually packaged alcohol wipes or towelettes. They are easily carried and are great helpers in cleaning up an emergency. Best of all though, take precautions to try to avoid having an emergency.

Note from Rochelle – Nu-Hope has flesh tone tape strips. Individually curve cut “pink tape” for the ostomates on peel off sheets. They’re always in my emergency kit in my purse and travel bag. Call for samples.


WEB SITE: www.ostomysolano.org

SOLANO

OSTOMY NEWS

MARCH 2016


DATE: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 2016 7:00PM



PROGRAM:    SAFETY  for  SENIORS  and  RECENT   SCAMS,  

                          CHRISTINA ,  VALLEJO  POLICE  COMMUNITY  SERVICES


REFRESHMENTS:  LEILANI  COLLINS


WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD

MEETING ROOMS A,B, & C, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS.


FROM  THE  PRESIDENT


Our next Vallejo meeting is March 16th.  Our speaker will be Christina from the Vallejo police department community services who will give us information on Senior Safety and current scams (Delayed from January).


Our meeting in Vacaville last month was terrific.  We had a gang of 12!  Again, thanks to Kathy for getting the room for that meeting and June & Sept.  It was wonderful that Michelle Peterson was also able to attend.  Michelle is the in-patient RN, CWCA for Kaiser Vacaville.  We had a good turnout for a wet night.  Our usual Vallejo trekkers from Vacaville – Sharon & David and Fairfield – Al & Brenda were able to attend and bring along Ophelia who we haven’t seen in so very long.  It was so very nice to get see our former President Frank and our former Newsletter Editor Jean.  We have so much to thank both of them for as Frank and Jean were the foundation of our group for so very long.  Great to be able have them with the Vacaville short trip.  And we welcomed a long time member who has been unable to make the Vallejo trip – Joyce.  It was so great to have a face to connect to a name.  Also, it was a pleasure to have Paul and Lucy who have been receiving the newsletter and were a great addition to the crowd.   A thank you to Julie who manned the Vallejo room at 7PM in case anyone should arrive for the non-meeting there.  We missed ya!


The Vaca group was happy to share hints, tips etc that we all learned from.  Our next OAS North meeting will have an Ostomy Products representative (with samples and product previews) or a Kaiser Dietician for either June and September meetings?  The dates will be worked out for who can come on which date.  So, please mark your calendars for these third Wednesdays, Kaiser Vacaville - June 15th and September 14th.   Please join us – let’s push to fill the room!  Location instructions will be in the June & September newsletters on the front page


Please help – We need copies of the Phoenix to include in our new ostomate packets.  Could you please save & donate them at a meeting or give me a call to pick up?


We look forward to seeing everyone in Vallejo on the 16th.    Have a fun and safe day on Saint Patrick’s Day.   Be wearing the green.  Watch out for the wee folk.  And have a delicious meal.  And yes, green dyed beer may make an ostomate temporarily be seeing green later.  Don’t panic.  There’s gold at the end of the rainbow. 


HELPFUL HINTS FOR SWIMMING

UOAA Update July 2015

 

Summer is here and you know what that means. More family trips to the beaches, lakes, pools, etc. Swimming is a great way to have fun, exercise and cool off. Having an ostomy should not stop you from relaxing in the water, going for a swim or enjoying other water sports. However, here are a few precautions you might want to take:

  • Don't change your pouch immediately before getting into the water, allow a few hours for it to set.

  • Picture frame the faceplate by applying micropore (pink, waterproof) tape around the edges to provide a waterproof seal. This will ensure that the faceplate adheres to the skin.

  • Wear a soft panty girdle (or pantyhose with the legs cut off) under a bathing suit if you feel it is needed to give extra security and support for the pouch.

  • If you will be in a spa, jacuzzi or hot tub beware as hot water destroys the pouches ability to contain odor. Also, you will probably not get as much wear time as usual.

  • Ladies, choose a swimsuit with a skirt and a "busy" pattern. This will effectively cover up the vulnerable spot. Boxer swim shorts work well for men.

  • Remember to drink lots of water. Sweating cools the skin, but moisture must be replaced.

 


HOW TO GIVE YOUR HDL A BOOST

UOAA Update July 2015

 

More than ever, the most recent government guidelines emphasize the health benefits of having a good HDL level. It's harder to raise levels of this "good" cholesterol than it is to lower the "bad" kind, but there are some things you can do. 

  • Get Aerobic Exercise: The longer and harder you exercise, the greater the effects will be.

  • Watch Your Weight: Lose excess weight through daily exercise and sensible eating.

  • Stop Smoking: Smoking lowers HDL by an average of five points and increases your total cholesterol level.

  • Medication: Talk to your doctor about medication. Your doctor can prescribe cholesterol-lowering drugs that can help to improve your cholesterol reading.

  • Saturated Fats vs. Non-Saturated Fats:  Replace saturated fats with non-saturated fats. For example: use olive oil for cooking.

 

HOW TO MANAGE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

UOAA Update July 2015

 

Your blood pressure is one of the most important components to your health and one of the most manageable. Referring to the force of the blood pushing against the walls of the arteries, our blood pressure naturally fluctuates with various daily activities like running or sleeping. When the pressure is too high, the heart works harder than it should, and dangerous health conditions can result, including heart and kidney disease, arteriosclerosis and stroke.

 

It's important to have your blood pressure checked regularly, since high blood pressure often has no warning signs or symptoms. Blood pressure is gauged by two numbers, both of which are important. The top number, or 

systolic pressure , is measured when your heart beats, the time when  your blood pressure is the greatest. The bottom number, or 

diastolic pressure, is measured when your heart is at rest between beats and your blood pressure falls. A blood pressure less than 120/80 mmHg is considered normal. No single cause of high blood pressure is known, but four factors do appear to strongly influence it. 


 They are:

 

1.     Weight: Maintaining a healthy weight is essential since blood pressure increases with body weight. Even losing small amounts of excess weight can improve your blood pressure.

 

2.     Physical Activity: People who exercise have a 20 to 50 percent lower risk of high blood pressure.

 

3.     Diet: Reducing the amount of sodium and salt you eat can cause your blood pressure to drop. Adults should eat no more than 2,400 mg of sodium (6 grams or 1 tsp.) each day.

 

4.     Alcohol Intake: Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure. To prevent high blood pressure, limit or avoid alcohol consumption.

 

For more information, visit  http://www.info-on-high-blood-pressure.com/



SUCCESSFUL AGING

By Grace Lynch: UOAA Update July 2015

 

Images of older people pumping iron, teaching ids to read, building homes for the homeless, surfing the net and tap dancing are abound in the media today. Whether they're selling vitamins or vacations, today's images of older people are a welcome substitute for stereotypes of the past. The images have changed because the realities have changed.

 

Today's older people are, in fact, nothing like their parents and grandparents.  For one thing, they are living a lot longer. The life expectancy for people age 65 and over is 17.4years. Compare this with the beginning of the century when the average life span was only 47.

 

While policy experts once worried that this gift of time would be marred by illness and disability, recent research reveals a gradual decline in chronic disease and disability. The number of people with high blood pressure, arthritis and emphysema has shown an unexpected and steady decline since 1982 and overall, according the the national Long-Term Care Survey, there has been a 15% drop in disability. Never before in history have so many older people had the opportunity to live so long and so well.

  

VITAMIN D HELPS ELDERLY AVOID FRACTURES

UOAA Update July 2015

 

Preventing broken bones as you age could be as easy as popping a vitamin D pill just three times a year. It's especially important to prevent bone thinning and fractures in the elderly. In fact, breaking the hip can even cause death in many elderly people -- due to an in crease in pneumonia or blood clots from being immobilized in bed. Prior studies have shown that a combination of vitamin D and calcium can reduce fractures. But researchers in a study wanted to see if vitamin D alone would have the same effect.

 

The study is published in the March 2009 issue of the British Medical Journal. Researchers studied more than 2,500 people ages 65 to 85. Each took 100,000 IV of vitamin D -- a high dose compared with the normal dose of 400 IU -- or a placebo every four months. People who took vitamin D were 22% less likely to have a fracture during the five-year study. They were also 33% less likely to have a fracture in areas of the body that are commonly affected by osteoporosis (hip, wrist, forearm, and vertebrae). There were no side effects of vitamin D and the cost is minimal.



 

If future research confirms that vitamin D is effective at preventing fractures, even when taken only a few times a  year -- this could be a welcome addition to staving off osteoporosis and the potentially serious health effects of this disease.



FRIENDS OF OSTOMATES WORLDWIDE (FOW-USA)

 By Ann Favreau, Vice President FOW-USA: UOAA July 2015

 

Since 1968, the Friends of Ostomates Worldwide-USA (FOW-USA) has collected new supplies from US individuals and groups and sent them overseas where needed.

 

The modern ostomy supplies we take for granted in the U.S. and other developed countries may be unavailable or too costly in many areas around the world.  People resort to plastic bags, rags, and duct tape, resulting in poor skin, odor, no jobs, no school.

 

A recent recipient of supplies said that he "often used linen wrappings in collecting stool but now he is so happy that he can now afford to put on proper appliances that are smart, neat and designed for that."  He used to spend much of his time seated at home and not in a position to travel and socialize with other fellow elders in his community due to lack or unavailability of ostomy appliances. But now, due to the provision of free ostomy supplies, he is able to move and associate with others.

 

You can make a difference through your donations of supplies and financial support. Please contact them at:  FOW-USA, 4018 Bishop Lane, Louisville, KY 40218.  Phone: 502-909-6669  - Website: www.fowusa.org


FAIR

By Debbie Hull: UOAA Update July 2015

 

The following article is available in I'd like To Buy A Bowel Please! by Barbara Elsagher.

 As a new ostomate, I attended my local ostomy support group and shortly afterward started receiving newsletters and other information. I got a flyer on an upcoming Appliance Fair. I assumed it had to do with refrigerators, stoves, and dishwashers. I live in an apartment and those items are included in the rent, so I thought an appliance fair was of no use to me. Thinking it was odd that an ostomy group would send a flyer for that, I glanced at the flyer again, and then realized I had misunderstood and the Appliance Fair was for people to learn about various ostomy products. When I went to the fair, I shared my story with WOCN, Pat Keegan. She put her arm around me and said, "Oh, honeyyou really are a rookie, aren't you?"

 

Debbie Hull, of Minnesota, was a typical healthy twentyyear-old when she suddenly became ill with Crohn's Disease in December, 1977. In 1984, she had ileostomy surgery and has been well ever since. Debbie says, "All the bad memories have faded, I can do anything I want: travel, work, exercise, eat what I want-life is good. I am grateful there was a solution for my situation." 



ON THE SHORT SIDE

By Kathy Ward, Admin Asst, UOAA July 2015

 

A lot of questions come in to me at National Office about leakage and how to apply a bag. For everyone it's different. What works for me doesn't necessarily work for others. However, by the responses I received from callers, I can give you a few tips that seemed to help a lot of people.

 

Question:  How do I stop my ostomy from leaking during the night?

Answer:  I can tell you how I solved this problem and hopefully, it will help you too. When I put my ostomy bag on, I usually have it at a diagonal. When I sleep, I sleep on my side in the direction I tilted my bag. Gravity will take it's course and pull anything coming out of your stoma down into the bag. If you are in the habit of sleeping on your back, gravity will bring everything down, which can be the cause of some seepage.

 

Question:  How do I get my bag to stick better?

Answer:  The first thing I do is to put the barring ring onto the wafer (or adhesive, whichever you use). Before placing it on my body, I use a hairdryer to warm up the barrier ring (or adhesive) for a few seconds to activate it. I find this works better than placing it on my body then trying to rub it with my hands to warm it up and activate it.

 

I always enjoy hearing from you, so call me at National Office (1-800-826-0826) and let me know if any of my tips have been working for you or if you have a tip you'd like to share.

FEBRUARY 2016



DATE: WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2016 7:00PM


PROGRAM: WELCOME TO the OSTOMY ASSOC. NORTH 

Rochelle Stacey and Kathy Musgraves, Kaiser will present WHAT the OAS North can do for you, with hints and tips for daily life with an ostomy.  Then a sharing session of WHAT DO YOU NEED from US.

REFRESHMENTS: ROCHELLE STACY

WHERE: KAISER VACAVILLE, 1 QUALITY DRIVE

CONFERENCE ROOM 3, 1ST FLOOR, WEST ENTRANCE, MEDICAL OFFICES B

Park in lot C 4 or 5 on the East Ackerly Drive side of the new building. Use the West Entrance (facing the bold. From Ackerly—near the left corner). The Conference rooms are on the first floor down the hallway on your right—past the restrooms on the left and before Area B18. Enter door #3.

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only. In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. ALWAYS check with your doctor.

To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com

FROM THE PRESIDENT


We are so THRILLED to now have 3 venues year to offer to our northern Solano residents. Those of you in the Solano cities of Vacaville, Faifield, Suisun City & Dixon, and those in Davis and Woodland please make a note. We will be at Kaiser Vacaville in 2016 for February 17th, June 15th, and September 14th. Please mark your calendars for these third Wednesdays of those months. Location instructions are on the front page.


Our meeting this month will be a meet and greet with discussions of the content you desire in the coming meetings. We will have refreshments, coffee/tea/bottled water, a door prize, a raffle and lots of fun, I hope. We will have an open discussion for those needing hints and tips to make living with an ostomy easier. Would you like to have an Ostomy Products representative (with samples and product previews) for either June or September? If so, come to the meeting and get in the vote for a date. Do you have a suggestion or desire of a presentation? It doesn't have to be an ostomy or healthcare subject either. We may be able to get a nutritionist or pharmacist to be a Vacaville presenter. Just so many possibilities for having a great time!


There is so much potential to make your life and that of you family members a lot better if you attend. Though not an necessity, but it would help if you could give me a call to to let me know if you plan to attend (707-447-0384). I'd love to see new faces and be just as excited to see those of you who have attended the Vallejo meetings. I've already had several current attendees who have confirmed for Vacaville this month. It would be terrific to hear from more. And those of you who don't like “support” groups, trust me, we're a fun group that is more family than group. We so enjoy the comradery and joy of helping any ostomates we can.


You do not have to be a member of the Ostomy Association of Solano to attend the meetings and we welcome both you and your family/significant others/attendant, all who help you in life are our friends too. The more the merrier! See you in Vacaville February 17th. Our next Vallejo meeting is March 16th. Our speaker will be Christina from the Vallejo Police Department Community Services who will give us information on Senior Safety and current scams.

Help us spread the word about colorectal cancer prevention!



You Can Help Prevent Colorectal Cancer

As a OSTOMATE, CANCER SURVIVOR or FAMILY MEMBER you can play an important part in the national effort to make sure 80% of adults ages 50 and older are regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.

The UOAA has joined the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable in this 80% By 2018 effort, but there is an equally important role that you can play. Think of it, you could help save over 200,000 lives.

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States among men and women combined, yet it's one of the most preventable.

Here are some ways that you can participate.


Share Your Story:

  • It helps to put a face on colorectal cancer and coveys the necessity for screening.

  • Chris4Life, Colon Cancer Alliance, Fight Colorectal Cancer and other organizations make it easy for survivors to share their stories.

  • Speak about the importance of screening to civic organizations, at your place of worship, work or school.

  • Share the prevention message in newsletters and your local newspaper. Talk about your family history.

  • Start with the people you know and love. Encourage your immediate relatives to let their doctor know about your diagnosis and establish a plan for regular colorectal cancer screening.

  • Parents, siblings and children of people who have had colorectal cancer are at higher risk for developing colorectal cancer and precancerous "polyps."

Visit nccrt.org to learn more and be part of 80% By 2018.


Ival Secrest, Chair

UOAA ASG Advisory Board







FLU & an OSTOMATE

by Anne Marie Knudsen, CWON, MN, CNS CFCN

UOAA Update 11/12


FACTS ABOUT THE FLU:

The Flu is caused by a virus spreading from an infected person to the nose and throat of others.

Symptoms usually appear within 2-3 days after being infected and a person with a fever is considered contagious for another 3-4 days. Here in the US the flu season generally runs from November to April. Flu symptoms include chills, fever, dry irritated cough, nasal congestion, a sore throat, muscle aches, pain and a headache. For a frail susceptible and elderly person complications can lead to hospitalization related to pneumonia and rarely death can occur.

Who should get a flu shot? All over 65, women pregnant or breastfeeding healthcare givers and patients with chronic medical conditions like asthma, immune deficiency, heart disease, etc. It is also recommended that students get the flu shot. It is a myth when people state they got the flu from the flue shot. Flu vaccine contains NO LIVE VIRUS which means it is impossible to get the flue from the flue shot.

Why do we need the flu shot every year? For the simple reason that the flu virus keeps hanging and the vaccine must be replaced. Flu shots only protect for one year.

The flu shot is 90% effective against type A & B influenza, but remember there can be different strands which means if one does get the flu the symptoms will be milder compated to not having gotten the flu shot.


THINGS TO DO IF YOU GET THE FLU:

First of all drink plenty of fluids and rest. Take some ibuprofen or Tylenol for fever and pain. Wash your hands frequently and use tissues versus a handkerchief. Keep your hands off your face except for eating and daily hygiene. Rinse the nasal cavities with a warm salt water or a steam bath with chamomile since these are soothing and will open the nostrils and bring down the viral population.

Boost the immune system with foods rich in vitamin C. You should take at least 1000 mg daily and supplement Zinc 15-20mg to boost the absorption of the vitamin C. Finally drink a many warm liquids as possible as the warm liquid will produce a wash off, proliferating the virus from the throat to the stomach. Because of the high acidic content of the stomach the virus will not be able to survive.


WHAT TO DO AS AN OSTOMATE WITH THE FLU:

Ostomates must take special care not to take any medication including laxatives without being prescribed by a doctor as they have no effect on viruses and can change the balance of the gut and case severe diarrhea. For the Colostomate the diet needs to change while recovering from thr flu. Eat a fiber free diet and then gradually move towards a regular, normal diet. DO NOT TAKE IRRIGATE WHILE HAVING DIARRHEA AND DO NOT TAKE LAXATIVES.

Some drugs and specific foods can cause constipation in colostomates. This can be prevented by increasing your fluid intake.


Ileostomates, diarrhea presents a big problem. In addition to causing excessive discharge a person with an ileostomy an risk an electrolyte imbalance. Most importantly POTASSIUM must be kept within safe levels. If vomiting and dehydration becomes and issue the ileostomate must go to the ER earlier than later. It cannot be stressed how important it is to go to the ER as an ileostomate cannot hydrate oneself fast enough.

It is recommended to drink Ginger Ale, bouillon and either Gatorade or Pedialyte. Always ensure the symptoms are related to the flu and not gastritis.


Urostomates, follow the same special care and make sure to protect the kidneys. Prompt attention of distress from the flu will make the difference.


GENERAL INFORMATION:

Always protect the abdominal muscles if coughing or sneezing as a parastomal hernia can develop and support belt can make a difference.

Always have Lomotil and Imodium plain and Imodium ES (extra strength) available. Imodium is by far the better hoice as it does not contain Atropine or Anti-cholinergics which can have ramifications with many medications as well as side effects.


POUCH OPTIONS with the flu

If you have a closed pouch switch to a drainable one and finally if you do get excoriated or raw peristomal skin use Milk of Magnesia, Mylanta or Maalox and dab it onto the raw skin areas and then blow dry on low until a white crust is seen. One can pouch on top of the white crust and the raw skin will be healed within 24 hours.

Always try to have a variety of pouches available at all times. Simply contact your vendors and ask for free samples.

GET YOUR FLU SHOT. IT IS WORTH IT


TIPS FOR THE UROSTOMATE

from North Central Oklahoma Ostomy Outlook and

The Bud, Chippewa Valley Ostomy Association


Check the pH of your urine about once a week to be sure the urine is acidic, with a pH of less than 6.0. Always wash your hands before working with your appliance or stoma to avoid introducing bacteria into the stoma. Reusable or disposable appliances that are not cleaned adequately or are worn for long periods of time can cause urinary tract infections from bacterial growth in the pouch and urine. Signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection include fever, chills, bloody urine, cloudy or strong smelling urine and pain in the back and kidney area. If you experience these symptoms, see your physician.



Internet/Newspaper Gleanings



 Study shows diet changes can quickly affect colon cancer risk — A study found black Americans who ate a high-fiber African diet for two weeks saw a significant decrease in colon cancer risk factors, while a group of Africans who ate an American diet high in animal protein and fat had increased risk factors. Researchers from the U.S. and the U.K. said one reason for the risk factor changes may be that gut bacteria changed their metabolism to adapt to the new diet. Reuters (4/26)

 Nutrient-packed fennel may have many health benefits — Fennel contains nutrients such as vitamin C, fiber and potassium and may have benefits for relieving digestive problems, menstrual cramps and other health conditions.

Vandana Sheth, registered dietitian nutritionist, said the fiber in the fennel bulb may help prevent colorectal cancer and RDN Beth Warren said fennel may help prevent gastrointestinal gas that can lead to colic in babies.

MedicalDaily.com (4/27)

 Gastroparesis: What you need to know — Diabetes is one of the most common causes of gastroparesis, a digestive disorder in which the stomach takes a long time to empty its contents. While diet is important in easing symptoms of gastroparesis, certain medications can worsen the condition. American College of Gastroenterology

 Study: Patients with IBD could benefit from vaccine education — University of Toronto researchers said inflammatory bowel disease patients may need education and counseling on vaccines from either a

gastroenterologist or primary care physician. A patient survey found many people did not know about recommended vaccinations or vaccine efficacy and safety.

Medscape (free registration) (5/12)

 Patient’s Perspective: Bonding through chronic illness — “Regardless of the chronic illness you suffer from, there is a common bond that most of us share. We all want to be understood and accepted. Many of us feel ashamed or guilt-ridden because of our disease. It can take a long time to prepare and analyze even the simplest of things (ex, eating dinner out or traveling.) We suffer from mental health issues related to the intense pain, worry, fear, and oftentimes, loneliness. I could go on and on.”

— blog post from Marisa on Journaling IBD.org.

 Some self-explanatory studies: Healthy weight, diet tied to colon cancer survival —Many colon cancer patients not told about the benefits of exercise — FDA advises public not to consume unpasteurized dairy products — Shoppers who use grocery list have better diet


ARE YOU HAVING TROUBLE SLEEPING 

AS YOU GROW OLDER?

UOAA Update July 2015


How much sleep do older people need? Most of us need about eight hours of sleep at night to feel fully alert when we're awake. Many things can get in the way of sleeping well or sleeping long enough. As we get older, we might have more trouble sleeping.


What sleep changes are coming in elderly people? People 65 and older may have trouble falling asleep when they go to bed at night. They might not stay asleep all night. They might wake up very early in the morning and not be able to go back to sleep.


These problems can make older people very sleepy in the daytime. The sleep-wake cycle changes as we get older, so we might get sleepy earlier in the evening and wake up earlier in the morning.


What causes sleep problems? Several things cause sleep problems. By the time we're in our 60s and 70s, our sleep-wake cycle doesn't seem to work as well. Some lifestyle habits (like drinking alcohol, caffeinated drinks, or smoking) can give us sleep problems.


Sleep problems may even be caused by illness, when pain keeps us from sleeping, or by medicines that keep us awake. People of all ages might have these sleep disorders: sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder.


NOTE FROM THE EDITOR

We ran an article in the January 2106 regarding bathing with your pouch off. The editor wishes to thank one of our members for letting us know that it is possible to get a UTI from taking a tub bath without wearing your appliance. As with all things, care should always be taken when you bathe in order to avoid this occuring.

DATE: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2016 7:00PM


PROGRAM: TBA (CHECK OUR WEBSITE @

www.ostomysolano.org)


REFRESHMENTS: JULIE WALTON


WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A, B & C, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS

FEBRUARY We meet in Vacaville – check President’s message!

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only. In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. ALWAYS check with your doctor.

To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Happy Happy Happy New Year! 
Personally, although it was a mostly good year, we’re sure glad to see a new era arrive. The hard work of getting our home repairs done and all that stress and eating out sent my hubby, Jim to the ER with congestive heart failure. All the physical box loading, ladders and sodium intake with his family history of atrial fibrillation (a-fib) caught up with him on Dec. 3
rd. He’s doing great now and following a strict diet and exercise program with a bunch of meds for the a-fib and such. I was flabbergasted when his test came back – no Golden Arches imprint on his heart with very little plaque and no clots. His one big complaint – decaf coffee! So truly we are lucky he’s here to grumble. He also has to wear an external defibrillator lifevest 24/7. 5 shock treatments in ICU didn’t bring him into regular beats. Of course my first question about the lifevest was “Where’s the WIFE button?” A friend came up with an even better one - “Where’s the NAUGHTY or NICE button? So nice he is being along with breathing and grumping. All is well. If you have some great “heart healthy” recipes that also have reduced sodium, I’d love to hear from you. Finding a variety for breakfast seems to be the worse part.Our Holiday Potluck was wonderful. The chicken was even better than normal and as usual we had side dishes and desserts that were sumptuous! A big THANK YOU TO JULIE for again fetching the main course, sides and gift cards, decorations and the to-go bowls!!!! The tally from the silent auction will be announced by our Julie at this meeting. All money raised goes to our Koins for Kids fund so we can again in 2016 send a child or two to Youth Rally. Thanx to those of you who brought an item for auction, those that bid and you who gave additional donations. And our generous members brought in over 30 pounds of non-perishable foods for F.I.S.H. Leftovers were distributed among us all and hugs and kisses abounded. Truly it was a festive and loving night in celebration of our gift of health and wonderful friends.
Who’s pie server got put in the dirty bin to go home with Rochelle? I’ll have it at the meeting. If you won’t be there, please call me to arrange for ransom payment.

A BIG THANK YOU to Pat Walling for her great Newsletters of 2015. SUPER JOB!!!!

Thank you Kathy Musgraves! She has secured Conference Room #3 in the main building of Kaiser Vacaville for February 17, June 15 and September 21, 2016 7PM.
2016 will the year we can provide a support meetings closer to home for those of you who live in the Eastern section of Solano. Next newsletter and the website will have directions and other information. So we can get a feel for an approximate number of attendees, could you please call me (707-447-0384) to let us know if you plan to attend and how many in your party. A good turnout will ensure future Vacaville meetings. As always, everyone is welcome. You need not be a member to attend the meetings. Please make note of these dates. No Vallejo meeting these dates only.
Rochelle

A few months ago we started including some articles from the UOAA to address some of the issues that a lot of ostomates have questions about. This month we will finish these articles for you.


Can I Get My Pouching System Wet?


Yes. You can shower, bathe, swim or even get in a hot tub with your pouching system on. It is a good habit to empty the pouch before showering, bathing or other water activities.

You can bathe or shower every day. On the day you plan to change your pouching system you can either leave it on or you can take the whole thing off to take your bath or shower.

Some people may choose to shower or bathe without their pouching system. Because the stoma has no muscle, urine or stool may drain from your stoma while showering or bathing.

Water won’t hurt your stoma or go inside you. If the water pressure is strong do not let it hit your stoma directly. Only use a gentle spray of water on your stoma.

Check your pouching system before and after water activities. If you are in the water for a long time the pouching system may start to loosen up from your skin.

Some people may find it helpful to wait an hour or so after changing their pouching system before swimming.

Pouching systems are waterproof. However, you may feel more secure if you wear an ostomy belt or put tape around the edges of your skin barrier when you are in the water.

Some people will secure the edges of the skin barrier with waterproof tape. Other people prefer to use paper tape and then wipe the paper tape with a skin sealant to make it more waterproof. If you have sensitive or fragile skin, the use of paper tape may be gentler on your skin than a waterproof tape. If you do put tape around the skin barrier edges do not remove the tape after water activities. Removing the tape may cause the skin barrier to loosen.

Some people wear tight ‘biking style’ shorts to keep their pouch close to the body and help keep it from ‘floating’.

Gas filters do not work after they get wet. Therefore, it is best to protect the filter with waterproof tape before water activities.

After bathing or swimming, you may use a towel or a hairdryer on the coolest setting to dry the tape and cloth packing of the pouching system to prevent skin irritation from wetness.


What Are Some Ways To Keep My Skin From Getting Irritated?

The best skin protection is a well-fitted and comfortable pouching system. Your WOC Nurse or healthcare provider will help you choose the system that works best for you.

The opening of your skin barrier should be no more than 1/8 inch away from the edge of your stoma unless otherwise instructed by your WOC Nurse or health care provider.

Measure your stoma once a week for the first six to eight weeks after your ostomy surgery. Your stoma shrinks while it is healing and you need to keep measuring so you can make sure that the opening in the skin barrier is the right size for your stoma.

Remeasure your stoma if any irritation develops between the stoma and skin barrier wafer.

It is helpful to hold your skin smooth as you put your pouching system on to avoid wrinkles that may lead to leakage.

Check your skin and the back of your skin barrier each time you change your pouching system. You can use a mirror to check your skin under the stoma. Look for any places where stool or urine may have leaked under the skin barrier and onto your skin. When you apply your next pouching system these areas may need some extra reinforcement with skin barrier strips, rings or paste. There are a variety of “paste” products available.

Your WOC Nurse or health care provider will advise you when this is recommended.

When you have a stoma that drains urine or loose stool you may want to consider using an extended wear skin barrier because it will give your skin added protection. Ask your

WOC Nurse or health care provider for help with selecting an extended wear

skin barrier.


I Have Sensitive Skin. Will The Skin Barrier Irritate My Skin?

If your skin is sensitive, it is helpful to tell your WOCNurse, or health care provider. A skin patch test may be necessary to see if you have any reaction to the different skin barriers and tapes. For the most part, the ingredients in the skin barriers do not cause skin irritation. If you are having a “reaction” to the skin barrier or tape, most of the time you will see skin

changes that match the shape of the product. Inform your WOC Nurse or health care provider so they can determine the cause of the irritation and recommend another product if needed. Itching or burning under the skin barrier may indicate that you have leakage, a

skin rash, or a skin infection. Y ou need to remove your pouching system as soon as possible to check your skin for any irritation.


How Can I Prevent Infection?

The stoma is your bowel. It is protected by mucus so stool or urine won’t hurt it. A stoma rarely becomes infected. The most important thing is to protect the skin around your stoma. A correct fitting pouching system is the best way to prevent an infection of your skin.


If There Is A Small Leak Under My Skin Barrier, Is It Okay To Patch It With Tape Or Paste?

Always change your pouching system at the first signs of leakage. Do not try to patch the pouching system with tape or paste. A leak under the skin barrier should not be fixed. Leaving a leaking pouch on can cause skin irritation.


How Can I Prevent Leakage?

Always empty your pouch before it is half-full.

Release gas before the pouch gets too full. If you have a lot of gas, you may want to consider using a pouch with a vent or filter.

There are some medications that may be used to reduce gas. Check with your WOC Nurse, health care provider or pharmacist to learn more about these medications.



I Perspire A Lot. How Can I Get The Pouching System So Stick Better?

You can dust the skin with an ostomy skin barrier powder to help absorb perspiration. Then dab skin sealant on top of the powder so the pouching system will stick to the skin.

There are additional ostomy adhesives available in sprays, wipes, skin cements and tapes.


What Can I Do To Remove Hair From Around My Stoma?

Some people shave with an electric razor while some dry shave with an ostomy skin barrier powder using a safety razor. Other people may use a safety razor and shave with mild soap and water. If a person decides to use shaving foam it is important to avoid foam that has

moisturizers or perfumes that may irritate the skin or keep the pouching system from sticking to the skin. Always wash the skin well with water after shaving.

Shaving or clipping excess hair around the stoma in the direction of hair growth may limit skin irritation.


No More Lactose in Your Diet?

From Metro MD, Jacques Labovitz and WebMD

Pouch June/July 2015

There are alternatives to dairy products for those of us on lactose free diets. You can use almond, coconut or soy milk or any combination thereof. Now they come in flavors or can be flavored at home. Also, they can be frozen to enjoy as ice cream. I personally prefer the almond milk as it tastes like a milkshake. Costco has its own brand, Kirkland lactose free milk. I have tasted it, but not bought it as yet. So there is life after your doctor says “no more lactose.”“On average, most lactose-intolerant people can tolerate about 250 ml of lactose,” says David Goldstein, MD, a gastroenterologist in Emerson, NJ. That’s about 1 cup (8 ounces) of dairy milk. Start by trying 1/2 cup of regular milk or

less with a meal. Take lactase tablets or capsules before eating or drinking foods that have dairy products or milk. Drink and cook with lactose-free milk. It has added lactase to break down the lactose. It also has about the same nutrients as regular milk.

The non-dairy options vary in nutrition, so before you buy compare the labels next to cow’s milk. Choose one that is fortified with calcium, vitamin D, and other nutrients. Use unsweetened non -dairy milk in savory dishes like mashed potatoes. You might like vanilla, chocolate or other flavors for baking. Some brands have low fat milk, eggnog, and low fat cottage cheese.

Some benefits: Soy milk—best source of protein, beige in color; Coconut milk—creamy like whole milk, little protein, about the same saturated fat as whole milk—4 grams/cup; Almond milk—texture like cow’s milk, slightly beige in color, tastes faintly like almonds, may have more calcium than dairy milk, along with vitamins D and E, 8-ounce glass of almond milk—only 1 gram of protein; Rice milk—white like cow’s milk, thinner, sweeter than almond milk, doesn’t work as well as thicker milks in sauces and puddings, low in protein, like almond milk, but may be fortified with calcium; Hemp

milk—thick, sometimes a little grainy, made of hemp seeds, which are high in heart -healthy omega-3 fatty acids, has protein but little calcium.

If you have stomach symptoms while using any non-dairy options, the problem may be guar gum. It’s often added for thickness, says Sonya Angelone, RDN, a dietician in San Francisco and a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “This can affect some people adversely, and they experience gas just like they might with lactose.

Basic Smoothie Recipe

12 ounces water, milk, milk alternative and/or yogurt

2 scoops protein powder, your choice of flavors

Look for whey casein or soy protein isolate for the protein source

Fruit — your choice, either frozen or fresh

Usually a safe combination to start with is 1 banana any size and 1 cup frozen

strawberries (frozen will make the shake thicker, fresh more watery).

1 cup of raw spinach

Start with a small amount of spinach to check for tolerance and taste. There is a good

chance you won’t be able to see or taste the spinach until you have added close to a cup.

See The Phoenix, June 2013, pages 32-35 for an article on the ins and outs of juicing with greens and precautions for those with ostomies.

1-2 tablespoons flaxseed oil or ground flax—optional

Great way to add calories. Start with a small amount to check for tolerance.

Adapted from Men’s Health: http://www.menshealth.com/njutrition/healthy-proteinsmoothie-recipes, accessed May 14, 2015.

Pouch June/July 2015



The Perineal Wound

Pouch June/July 2015

If you have a new ostomy and had your rectum and anus removed as part of your ostomy surgery, you will have what is called a perineal wound, the area of the perineum where the anus and rectum used to be. This area requires a great deal of care and attention and can be quite tender for a long time.

You may feel as though you will never be able to sit comfortably again, and eating and watch TV while standing is no fun. The area may take a long time to heal, because it takes a long time for scar tissue to fill the opening. The amount of time to achieve complete healing can vary from a few weeks to more than a year, depending on the individual circumstances.

This area does not usually have a good flow of blood that is necessary for quick healing. It is very important that the outer part of the wound does not heal before the inner part, lest abscesses and fistulae form. Fluids may accumulate in these areas, forming pockets, allowing infection to set in. Some surgeons pack the wound with gauze and leave it open to allow healing from the inside out. Other surgeons believe that the skin should be stitched together. This requires drainage tubes and the use of absorbent pads.

While you are waiting for the perineal wound to heal, you may be more comfortable sitting on a soft cushion. It is not a good idea to sit on a “doughnut cushion” because it causes the skin to pull outward, putting more strain on the area causing pain. Stretching the area can also slow down the healing. Sitz-baths can be both soothing and helpful. Park your derriere in warm water. Not only is this pleasant, relaxing and comfortable, but it can stimulate the blood circulationfor better healing. Furthermore, to reduce the healing time, keep the area clean. Use a hand -held shower spray twice a day for ten minutes or as directed by your doctor. To avoid infections, follow doctor’s orders very closely.

Thanks to The Ostomist, Greater Seattle Ostomy Assoc. via UOA of Chicago, IL and OSG of DuPage County

DECEMBER 2015



DATE: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2015 7:00PM


PROGRAM:


REFRESHMENTS:


WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS



The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only. In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such. ALWAYS check with your doctor.

To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com


Rosebud Stoma Pins

Everyone needs to understand that any ostomate who has a hospital stay may not ever see a WOCN unless they are a new ostomate, because hospitals are cutting costs whenever they see an opportunity. A WOCN will train floor nurses in a hospital to do almost everything associated with ostomy management including changing an appliance, because the staffing of WOCNs is not sufficient to meet all the ostomy demands in a hospital. We have learned that some of the WOCNs award a Stoma Pin to a nurse when they have completed ostomy training. If you see a nurse wearing a stoma pin, please thank them for taking an interest in ostomy care. 


FLU & an OSTOMATE

by Anne Marie Knudsen, CWON, MN, CNS CFCN

UOAA Update 11/12


FACTS ABOUT THE FLU:

The Flu is caused by a virus spreading from an infected person to the nose and throat of others.

Symptoms usually appear within 2-3 days after being infected and a person with a fever is considered contagious for another 3-4 days. Here in the US the flu season generally runs from November to April. Flu symptoms include chills, fever, dry irritated cough, nasal congestion, a sore throat, muscle aches, pain and a headache. For a frail susceptible and elderly person complications can lead to hospitalization related to pneumonia and rarely death can occur.

Who should get a flu shot? All over 65, women pregnant or breastfeeding healthcare givers and patients with chronic medical conditions like asthma, immune deficiency, heart disease, etc. It is also recommended that students get the flu shot. It is a myth when people state they got the flu from the flue shot. Flu vaccine contains NO LIVE VIRUS which means it is impossible to get the flue from the flue shot.

Why do we need the flu shot every year? For the simple reason that the flu virus keeps hanging and the vaccine must be replaced. Flu shots only protect for one year.

The flu shot is 90% effective against type A & B influenza, but remember there can be different strands which means if one does get the flu the symptoms will be milder compated to not having gotten the flu shot.


THINGS TO DO IF YOU GET THE FLU:

First of all drink plenty of fluids and rest. Take some ibuprofen or Tylenol for fever and pain. Wash your hands frequently and use tissues versus a handkerchief. Keep your hands off your face except for eating and daily hygiene. Rinse the nasal cavities with a warm salt water or a steam bath with chamomile since these are soothing and will open the nostrils and bring down the viral population.

Boost the immune system with foods rich in vitamin C. You should take at least 1000 mg daily and supplement Zinc 15-20mg to boost the absorption of the vitamin C. Finally drink a many warm liquids as possible as the warm liquid will produce a wash off, proliferating the virus from the throat to the stomach. Because of the high acidic content of the stomach the virus will not be able to survive.


WHAT TO DO AS AN OSTOMATE WITH THE FLU:

Ostomates must take special care not to take any medication including laxatives without being prescribed by a doctor as they have no effect on viruses and can change the balance of the gut and case severe diarrhea. For the Colostomate the diet needs to change while recovering from thr flu. Eat a fiber free diet and then gradually move towards a regular, normal diet. DO NOT TAKE IRRIGATE WHILE HAVING DIARRHEA AND DO NOT TAKE LAXATIVES.

Some drugs and specific foods can cause constipation in colostomates. This can be prevented by increasing your fluid intake.


Ileostomates, diarrhea presents a big problem. In addition to causing excessive discharge a person with an ileostomy an risk an electrolyte imbalance. Most importantly POTASSIUM must be kept within safe levels. If vomiting and dehydration becomes and issue the ileostomate must go to the ER earlier than later. It cannot be stressed how important it is to go to the ER as an ileostomate cannot hydrate oneself fast enough.

It is recommended to drink Ginger Ale, bouillon and either Gatorade or Pedialyte. Always ensure the symptoms are related to the flu and not gastritis.


Urostomates, follow the same special care and make sure to protect the kidneys. Prompt attention of distress from the flu will make the difference.


GENERAL INFORMATION:

Always protect the abdominal muscles if coughing or sneezing as a parastomal hernia can develop and support belt can make a difference.

Always have Lomotil and Imodium plain and Imodium ES (extra strength) available. Imodium is by far the better hoice as it does not contain Atropine or Anti-cholinergics which can have ramifications with many medications as well as side effects.


POUCH OPTIONS with the flu

If you have a closed pouch switch to a drainable one and finally if you do get excoriated or raw peristomal skin use Milk of Magnesia, Mylanta or Maalox and dab it onto the raw skin areas and then blow dry on low until a white crust is seen. One can pouch on top of the white crust and the raw skin will be healed within 24 hours.

Always try to have a variety of pouches available at all times. Simply contact your vendors and ask for free samples.

GET YOUR FLU SHOT. IT IS WORTH IT


When is a good time to change

my pouching system?

Choose a day and time that is best for you. Try to pick a time when you won’t be disturbed and when your stoma is not putting out a lot of drainage.

The best time to change the pouching system is different for everyone. For most people, the stoma is less active before eating or drinking in the morning. Some people will do their care while they take their bath or shower. Other people may choose to do their care at the

end of the day or at least two hours after a meal.


How do I get my old pouching system off?

Take your time when you remove your pouching system. You do not want to rip it off because this may hurt your skin. Try to remove it in the direction your

hair grows.

Loosen and lift the edge of the pouching system with one hand and push down on the skin near the skin barrier with the other hand. You may find it helpful to start at the top and work down to the bottom so you can see what you are doing, which would also

allow the pouch to catch any drainage.

Some people use warm water to remove the pouching system and other people may use adhesive remover. If you use adhesive remover it is very important to wash off all the adhesive remover from your skin with soap and water and dry the skin completely before you put on your new pouching system.

Sometimes your skin may look pinker, redder or darker right after you take off your pouching system. This should fade away in a few minutes.

How do I clean around my stoma?

To clean the skin around your stoma, all you reallyneed to use is warm water and a washcloth, or good quality paper towels. The use of gauze or gloves is not

necessary and can be expensive.

It is not necessary to use soap to clean around yourstoma. But if you prefer to use soap, use a very mild soap. Avoid using soaps and cleansers with oils, perfumes, or deodorants since these can sometimes cause skin problems or keep your skin barrier from sticking.

Rinse the soap off the skin around your stoma very well because the residue may keep your skin barrier from sticking and may also cause skin irritation.

If you are using paste, it may be easier to remove the paste before you wet the area. Some people may use adhesive remover. Do not worry if a little bit of paste

is left on your skin.

Always dry your skin well before putting on your new pouching system.

Sometimes you may see a small amount of blood on your cloth. The stoma tissue contains small blood vessels and may bleed a small amount when cleaned. Any bleeding that does not stop should be reported to your health care provider.

The stoma has no nerve endings, so you are not able to feel, if you are rubbing too hard. Therefore, use a gentle touch when cleaning around the stoma, do not scrub.

Do not use alcohol or any other harsh chemicals to clean your skin or stoma. They may be irritating to your skin.

Do not use moistened wipes, baby wipes or towelettes that contain lanolin or other oils, these can interfere with the skin barrier sticking and may irritate your skin.

Unless recommended, do not apply powders or creams to the skin around your stoma because they can keep your skin barrier from sticking.

What should I do with my soiled

supplies after I change my

pouching system?

Put your soiled pouching system into a plastic bag and throw it away in your household garbage. It is recommended to empty your pouch into the toilet first.

For odor control with disposal when away from home, carry 1 – 2 plastic storage bags in a pocket or purse. If you used soft paper towels to wash your skin, you can throw them away with your pouching system in your household garbage.

If you used washable items such as a washcloth to wash your skin, they may be washed with your house hold laundry.

Some people who wear a two-piece pouching system choose to remove the pouch to empty it and then attach a clean one. They may decide to rinse out the soiled pouch and reuse it later.

Some people use reusable (can be used over and over again) pouching systems. If you use this type of pouching system, follow the cleaning instructions

from the manufacturer.

If you use a clamp to close your pouch, remember to save it. Carry an extra clamp with you in case it breaks.

If you wear a urostomy pouch, the connector for use at bedtime should be saved and used again.

The clamp and connector should be washed with soap and water.

Wash your hands after taking care of your ostomy. You do not need to wear gloves.





NOVEMBER 2015

DATE: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2015 6:30PM

PROGRAM:HOLIDAY POTLUCK

REFRESHMENTS:  ROTISSERIE CHICKEN, POTATO SALAD, COLESLAW AND BEVERAGES PROVIDED.  PLEASE BRING A SALAD, SIDE DISH OR DESSERT.

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS



FROM THE PRESIDENT

We had a wonderful turnout for Joy Leek from Hollister. Joy showed us so many new products and gave great information on how to use current products. Items that were a big hit with the attendees were: Cera Plus barriers for a 2 piece system with Ceramide for skin irritation. Soft flexible CONVEX 1 piece drainable pouch. Spray silicon adhesive remover with ability to spray 360 degrees. Sprayed on the tape of a barrier and it will release in 15 – 30 seconds. There is also a wipe of this silicon product.

Thin Adapt rings – Joy demonstrated how to stack convex rings to build up a barrier that will decrease leakage for a recessed stoma. She also demonstrated the 4” Adapt ring as an additional barrier to decrease leakage.

Joy was also kind enough to pass out Hollister black bags and teaching sheets

Hollister has always been an excellent supporter of the UOAA and provider of excellent and innovative products for ostomates. We greatly appreciate their support of the Ostomy Association of Solano in providing us a wonderful program for October.

We received a lovely thank you from Jacob, the 12 year old ostomates who we sponsored for Youth Rally. His note remarked that it was an amazing experience. “I was immediately accepted by a lot of people. I am definitely coming back next year. Everyone was so open. I learned that most people are basically the same. I also learned a lo about other disabilities.” Our grant was obviously well spent. We also received a letter from the Mary Beth Akers, VP & CFO of Youth Rally thanking us for the donation of $625. Their goal that no child is ever turned away related to inability to pay registration and/or travel costs was achieved once again in 2015. This grant is the only donation the Ostomy Association of Solano gives. And this year as in the past, it is heart-warming to get the thank you note. On a related note: The sales of the Halloween treat bags were brisk both in September and October resulting in more money raised for our 2016 donation to Youth Rally. Thank you to those who bought bags.


A big THANK YOU to Julie for the wonderful holiday appropriate TREATS. Earl A.won the door prize – congrats!


As noted on the front page – we will NOT BE MEETING IN NOVEMBER. As usual with holiday and family commitments, our turnout would be low. So we will see you on December 16th for our Holiday Potluck. We’ll have that same wonderful rotisserie chicken, coleslaw and potato salad as our previous celebrations. Beverages will be provided, so please bring a side dish, salad, dessert or you most renown treat to share. We will be having a silent auction (to raise more funds for Youth Rally, so please also bring an item for the auction – small or large – every penny raised goes to the kids. We will also be accepting canned and non-perishable foods for donation to F.I.S.H. – a Solano food bank. We hope to see you in December – we gather at 6:30PM and dine at 7PM. Bring your potluck contribution, F.I.S.H. goods, money for the auction and joy and cheer for the season. It’s always a fun night!


Have a safe and wonderful Thanksgivng.

Vitamin B-12 Replacement Therapy

by Bob Baumel, Ostomy Association of North Central Okalahoma

UOAA Update May 2015
Pouch June/July 2015

Vitamin B-12 is, under normal conditions, absorbed in only a small section of the terminal small

intestine (ileum), raising the possibility of B-12 deficiency if that section of the ileum has been removed surgically or damaged by disease. People who may have lost that portion of their ileum include some ileostomates, people who had a failed J-pouch or Kock pouch, and some people with urinary diversions (especially continent urinary diversions) made using the terminal ileum. A condition such as Crohn’s disease may have damaged the terminal ileum, even if it hasn’t been removed surgically.

Vitamin B-12 is necessary for many metabolic processes, including development of red blood cells and

maintains normal functioning of the nervous system. Deficiency causes anemia (reduced oxygen carrying capacity of the blood resulting in fatigue) and can also cause nervous system damage. It’s worth noting that folic acid (another B vitamin) can correct the anemia caused by vitamin B-12, but will not correct the nerve damage caused by B-12 deficiency. So it’s important to get enough vitamin B-12.

If you think you are at risk for vitamin B-12 deficiency, you can ask your doctor to check your serum (blood) B-12 level. This test can be added easily to routine blood testing. If your ability to absorb vitamin B-12 by the normal pathway involving the terminal ileum has been impaired, you can supplement the vitamin by three basic methods:

 By Injection—This method bypasses the normal gastrointestinal process of B-12 absorption by inserting it into the body by intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. B-12 injections may be self-administered in the same way that diabetic patients can give themselves insulin shots. Maintenance therapy may require only one B -12 injection per month.

 Nasally—This method also bypasses the normal gastrointestinal absorption process, as vitamin B-12 can be absorbed through nasal mucous membranes. The nasal form of B-12 was developed first as a nasally applied gel and later a true nasal spray (brand name Nascobal®). This product is marketed by Strativa Pharmaceuticals, who promotes it as the only FDA approved form of vitamin B-12 besides the injectable form. Nasal B-12 can be effective, but because one company has the sole rights to distribute it in the U.S.A., it can be an expensive way to get your vitamin B-12.

 Orally—Until recently, doctors believed that B-12 taken orally was useless to people who lack the normal absorption mechanism involving the terminal ileum. That opinion has changed, however, as research has revealed that even in such people, when a large dose of vitamin B-12 is taken orally, a small fraction (typically around 1%) gets absorbed by mass-action transport across the gut.

Note: Time Released medications should, in general, be avoided if you have an ileostomy as they may pass through your gut without getting absorbed adequately.


How often should I change my pouching system?

How often you will need to change your pouching system depends on the type of stoma, the location of the stoma, and the kind of drainage from the stoma.

There are three basic types of ostomies. Urostomies are for urine, colostomies are for drainage of the large bowel and ileostomies are for drainage of the small bowel.

Using the right type of pouching system and putting it on the right way will also affect how long you can wear it. Wear time may be affected by other factors such as activity level, body shape, and perspiration.

Many pouching systems are made to be worn for three to seven days. However, there are some pouching systems that are made to be changed every day. The type of pouching system you think is best for you is a personal decision. However, issues of reimbursement from Medicare or your private insurance company may influence this decision.

Contact your WOC Nurse or health care provider if you are changing your pouching system more often than expected or suddenly more frequently than your normal wear time.


Should I use a skin sealant?

A skin sealant, sometimes called barrier film, does not have to be used. The sealant puts a plastic like coating on the skin. It comes in the form of sprays, wipes, and gels.

A skin sealant may help if you have skin that tears easily, have problems with leakage, or are using an ostomy skin barrier powder. Some people who have dryor oily skin find that their pouching system sticks better when they use a skin sealant.

Most skin sealants contain alcohol and if the skin has an open area the sealant will cause a burning feeling when applied. Alcohol-free (non-sting) skin sealants are available.

A tip for use: Make sure the skin sealant dries copletely before putting the pouching system on your skin.

Should I use adhesive remover?

Remember the basic rule that you do not want to use too many products on the skin. So if the pouching system can be gently removed with water then you do not need to use adhesive remover. Do use adhesive remover if you have skin that tears

very easily.

Sometimes people will use adhesive remover to prevent a build up of sticky residue on their skin.

Adhesive remover often contains alcohol and feels oily.

-- A tip for use: After using adhesive remover always wash well with water and a mild soap to remove the oily coating on the skin. Then rinse the skin well with water and dry completely.

Do I need to use a skin barrier paste?

Ostomy skin barrier paste is used as caulking to fill in gaps and creases. It will help even-out the skin surface around the stoma. This way the paste helps to make a better seal with the pouching system and prevent leakage.

You do not need to use paste if the skin around your stoma is smooth, you are getting a good fit with your pouching system, or you are not having any problems

with leakage.

Paste often contains alcohol and will cause a burning feeling if used on open skin.

--Tips for use: Apply the paste around the opening cut in the skin barrier, unless instructed otherwise. Use only a small bead of paste, like putting toothpaste on a brush.

Let the paste sit for one minute (this gives the alcohol in the paste the chance to evaporate). Do not spread the paste. Do not use too much paste. When trying to remove paste from the skin let it dry a little first. Do not worry if a little bit of paste is left on your skin.

What are ostomy adhesives?

Ostomy adhesives like cements and sprays can have a latex or an acrylic base. They are used to increase the stickiness between the pouching system and the skin.

Adhesives are NOT USED very often. When possible use latex-free products.

--Tips for use: Only a light, even coating of an adhesive should be used. Give the adhesive time to dry completely before putting on the pouching system. It is important to follow the manufacturer’s directions. Many adhesives need to dry for three to five minutes. This helps to decrease the chance of chemicals hurting the skin.

When do I need to use skin barrier powder?

Ostomy skin barrier powder is used to dry a raw, weepy area on the skin. You only need to use powder if you are having a problem with your skin.

--Tips for use: Only a light dusting of an ostomy skin barrier powder should be used. Many people will dab or spray a skin sealant over the powder before putting their pouching system on to help it seal better.

What kind of skin barrier is best?

Some skin barrier wafers are called standard wear and others are extended wear. Your WOC Nurse or health care provider will tell you what kind is right for you. In general, a standard wear barrier is used when the stool is semi-formed or formed. An extended wear barrier is

usually used when a stoma drains urine or when a stoma drains stool that is loose or liquid. The extended wear barrier does not break down like a standard wear barrier,

when it comes in contact with loose to liquid drainage.

For individuals who have had ostomy surgery, it is important to know the effects of various foods on ileal output. The effects may vary with the remaining portion of functioning bowel.


As I Age

Pouch June/July 2015

 I don’t trip over things, I do random gravity checks.

 I don’t need anger management, I need people to stop

making me angry.

 The biggest lie I tell myself is “I don’t need to write that

down, I’ll remember it.”

 I talk to myself because sometimes I need expert advice.

 Sometimes I roll my eyes out loud.

 When I was a child I thought nap time was punishment—

now it’s like a mini-vacation.

 I don’t have grey hair, I have “wisdom highlights.” I’m

just very wise.

 I’ve lost my mind and I’m pretty sure my kids took it.

 Wouldn’t be great if we could put ourselves in the dryer for ten

minutes, then come out wrinkle-free and three sizes smaller?

 If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on

my knees.



A Loving Wife Speaks Out

By Sandie Storer, Warner Robins, GA

Pouch June/July 2015

Family members experience a period of adjustment to ostomies just as ostomates do. I would like to share the process of adjustment I’ve undergone as a spouse, in order to encourage others. I hope other spouses or loved ones can benefit from knowing the process of change I have experienced concerning my husband, Gene’s, ileostomy, and that they will realize any guilt or pain will pass to brighter days.

The change is our lives seems so much smaller than it did a year and a half ago when my husband had

ileostomy surgery. Looking back on the process of acceptance, I can see different stages much as one experiences in bereavement.

Denial — For the year prior to Gene’s surgery, we both denied its necessity. I tended to slip back and forth between denial and anger. I was angry that he was denying the inevitable—then I would deny it. When he actually had the operation, I tried to act like nothing had happened. I refused to look at his stoma and wanted nothing to do with the ostomy association. This was a mistake. Now I see there were avenues of emotional support the association had to offer, but I was pretty stubborn.

Anger — I had little support here in our home community as we were fairly new in the area and I got into some pretty traumatic emotional problems. I became very angry and withdrawn and had to rely on professional help to bring me around to the bargaining stage.

Bargaining — I was angry with Gene for something he had no control over. Once I admitted that, I was

willing to talk with him about compensating for his stoma. I was expecting him to somehow be a better husband to make up for “what he was putting ME through,” When I could have been a staunch support for him, I was expecting HIM to consider ME. Thank goodness he had his ostomy nurse, the doctors, and the local ostomy association to help him.

Depression — I finally reached the depression state and spent a lot of time sleeping. It was difficult to do housework. I started to feel guilty about not giving him support and for being so upset with the procedure that would put an end to the dreaded ulcerative colitis he had suffered for ten years, a procedure which probably saved his life.

Acceptance — Now I am more accepting of his ileostomy. I will someday make some fancy pouch covers—maybe a Santa Claus! Seeing how well other ostomates get along in the world has been encouraging to me. What has happened is not something terrible, but something life-giving and wonderful.

Thanks to The Ostomist, Great Seattle Ostomy Assoc. via many other newsletters



SEPTEMBER 2015



DATE: WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2015 7:00PM


PROGRAM: UNDER THE PANTS & OVER THE POUCH

JULIE WALTON & NAOMI HARADA


REFRESHMENTS: LEILANI COLLINS

FROM THE PRESIDENT



Our August 19th meeting was apparently a hit. Sorry I missed it (Emergency room—dehydration, etc., just one of those fun things about being an ileostomate). The speaker was Mike Maroski from Dogs 4 Diabetics. This non-profit organization trains dogs to alert their owner when their blood sugar drops. Low blood can lead to unconsciousness or even coma. The dogs (donated by Dogs for the Blind) have over 2 years of training and socialization prior to being placed with an owner. The dogs are provided at no cost to the diabetic owner.

The four legged speaker was a black lab named Mezzo. Mezzo and is owner demonstrated how the dog goes from a calm head in the lap to actively licking his owner when his keen sense of smell alerts Mezzo of his owner's blood sugar change. Type 1 diabetics are the largest population served by these dogs. The D4D animals work for their owner as an alert dog for 8-10 years. They are then treated as a pet as a younger dog is brought into service.

We again thank the D4D organization for being so generous to give us a night of invaluable information. We hope this can help someone in our membership or their families to find the help they may need. Inquiries and information can be found at the D4D Concord office at 925-216-5785 or www.dogs4diabetics.com.


My apologies, I had an oops in last months message. It's Kathy Whitson-Lenn formerly of Queen of the Valley hospital, who has opened Napa Wound Healing Institute 707-266-1246. We look forward to a long and healthy relationship for our ostomates and the Napa Wound Healing Institute, 3417 Valley Verde Drive, Napa, CA 94558. Again, let's support Kathy and let her know how needed she is in our area.


This meeting, Wednesday, September 16th will have TWO wonderful speakers. Our own favorite nurses, Julie and Naomi. They will be showing you goodies and product lines for “Under The Pants and Over The Pouch”. Please bring your own favorite things and tips to share with the group. Again I shall not be able to attend, but this time for a fun thing. So you all have fun and help one another.


Hope all for rain, more rain and no floods. Rochelle

World Ostomy Day is on October 3, 2015 and that is less than one month away. This is a time to raise awareness within your community and within your state.





HOW TO MANAGE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

UOAA Update - July 2015…

Your blood pressure is one of the most important components to your health and one of the most manageable. Referring to the force of the blood pushing against the walls of the arteries, our blood pressure naturally fluctuates with various daily activities like running or sleeping. When the pressure is too high, the heart works harder than it should, and dangerous health conditions can result, including heart and kidney disease, arteriosclerosis and stroke.

It's important to have your blood pressure checked regularly, since high blood pressure often has no warning signs or symptoms. Blood pressure is gauged by two numbers, both of which are important. The top number, or systolic pressure , is measured when your heart beats, the time when your blood pressure is the greatest.

The bottom number, or diastolic pressure, is measured when your heart is at rest between beats and your blood pressure falls. A blood pressure less than 120/80 mmHg is considered normal. No single cause of high blood pressure is known, but four factors do appearto strongly influence it. They are:

1. Weight: Maintaining a healthy weight is essential since blood pressure increases with body weight. Even losing small amounts of excess weight can improve your blood pressure.

2. Physical Activity: People who exercise, have a 20-to-50 percent lower risk of high blood pressure.

3. Diet: Reducing the amount of sodium and salt you eat can cause your blood pressure to drop. Adults

should eat no more than 2,400mg of sodium (6 grams or 1 tsp) each day.

4. Alcohol Intake: Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure. To prevent high blood pressure,

limit or avoid alcohol consumption.

For more information, visit http://www.info-on-high-blood-pressure.com


VITAMIN D HELPS AVOID FRACTURES & MORE...

UOAA Update - July 2015

Preventing broken bones, especially as you age, could be as easy as popping a vitamin D pill just three times a year. It's especially important to prevent bone thinning and fractures in the elderly. In fact, breaking the hip can even cause death in many elderly people — due to an increase in pneumonia or blood clots from being immobilized in bed. Prior studies have shown that acombination of vitamin D and calcium can reduce fractures. But researchers in one study wanted to see if vitamin D alone would have the same effect.

The study is published in the March 2009 issue of the British Medical Journal. Researchers studied more than 2,500 people ages 65 to 85. Each took 100,000 IV of vitamin D — a high dose compared to the normal dose of 400 IU — or a placebo, every four months. People who took vitamin D were 22% less likely to have a fracture during the five-year study. They were also 33% less likely to have a fracture in areas of the body that are commonly affected by osteoporosis (hip, wrist, forearm, and vertebrae). There were no side effects of vitamin D and the cost is minimal.

If future research confirms that vitamin D is effective at preventing fractures, even when taken only a few times a year -- this could be a welcome addition tostaving off osteoporosis and the potentially serious health effects of this disease.

Finally, now, more than ever before, the most recent government guidelines emphasize the health benefits of having a good HDL level. It's harder to raise levels of this "good" cholesterol than it is to lower the "bad" kind, but there are some things you can do:

Get Aerobic Exercise: The longer and harder you exercise, the greater the effects will be.

Watch Your Weight: Lose excess weight through daily exercise and sensible eating.

Stop Smoking: Smoking lowers HDL by an average of five points while it also increases your total

cholesterol level.

Medications: Talk to your doctor about medication. Your doctor can prescribe cholesterol-lowering

drugs that can help to improve your cholesterol reading.

Saturated Fats vs. Non-Saturated Fats: Whenever and as often as possible, replace saturated fats

with non-saturated fats. For example: use olive oil for cooking.



How to Tell Someone You Have an Ostomy

Edited by B. Brewer 

UOAA Update, October 2014

In this world of technological advances, there are all kinds of people clamoring for information about you. Here are some questions you should ask yourself when giving out personal information.

"How will I benefit from certain persons having certain information?" and "How will the person asking the questions benefit from my answers?"

Thinking back to those critical days of adjustment just after your ostomy surgery, you may only have wanted people around you that you trusteed and loved. At that time, you may have needed the support of a spouse, friend, or children. In order for those people to support you, they needed to know about your ostomy surgery. By sharing this information you were helped through what for some was a very difficult time. Once you were home, friends and neighbors started to call, and then visit, when you felt up to it. The question arose as to "When do I tell them about my surgery?" Probably you thought about each person, the closeness you felt, and his or her relationship with you-and maybe the sincerity of that person's concern for you.

After considering these factors, you may have made a decision to tell the person about your ostomy. Based upon the reaction to your story, you made another decision-to either tell or not tell about your ostomy to those who inquired about your health.

As your health progresses and you return to work, the questions arise.

"Should I tell my employer about my ostomy?"

"Do I need support from my employer because of my ostomy?" and/or

"How does my employer knowing about my situation help me?"

This becomes situational. For example, if I work an assembly line and must take prescheduled breaks, and I'm still adjusting to emptying my pouch, I may or may not need a different schedule for breaks than those enforced. My employer needs to know that I'm not just breaking the rules, but have a real need.

How do you tell someone you have an ostomy? It becomes a matter of who has a right to know and how you will benefit from their knowing. To tell someone you have an ostomy becomes clearer when the benefits are weighed. Simply explain that you had some surgery for whatever reason you had your surgery, and it necessitated having an alternate route made for emptying either your bowels or bladder. By having had this surgery, you were given the chance to increase the length and quality of your life. Share with the person whom you have decided has a right to know about your surgery using pamphlets and brochures available from UOAA and other sources. Educate those persons you believe have a vested interest in your well-being.



Coping With Infection...Facts and Fallacies

via Reno Ostomy Association Truckee Meadows Informer

UOAA Update, October 2014

It is true that our bodies contain many normal bacteria; we do not live in a sterile world. We humans have a natural immunity to many of these organisms; some are even helpful in keeping down growth of more harmful bacteria.

 

Infection occurs when the number or organisms exceed the body's ability to handle them. Some of the first signs of infection in the area of a wound are redness, swelling, pain on touch, and often fever.

 

It is important to report such symptoms to your doctor before it becomes serious. He or she may want to culture the drainage to determine what organisms are present. Besides local cleaning of a wound, an antibiotic is often prescribed to treat any infection that might be in your system.

 

The same thing does not work for everything. The good news is that with today's drugs, infections are more easily cured. Many ostomy patients worry about bacteria.

 

Those with colostomies and ileostomies ask if their stomas will become infected from the discharge of stool. THIS IS A MYTH!

 

The stoma is accustomed to the normal bacteria in the intestine.

  • Keep the skin around the area clean and be careful of adjacent wounds.

  • Keep the fecal drainage away from the incision.

  • Don't worry about the ostomy becoming infected from the normal discharge...our bodies are accustomed to certain bacteria.



AUGUST 2015

DATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2015 7:00PM

PROGRAM: DOGS FOR DIABETICS
SPEAKER: RALPH HENDRIX AND FRIEND

REFRESHMENTS: LYN SCOTT

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS



FROM THE PRESIDENT
Hope all of you had a wonderful summer break.  We're back and ready to rumble............
We have a very interesting speaker(s) this month.  The two legged one (Ralph) will have some terrific information about a wonderful service dog program, Dogs4Diabetics.  And I guess I gave away the second "speaker's" part of the program--a dog from D4D.  This is a program not to be missed if you or someone you know is an insulin-dependant diabetic!
And for the rest of us, a wonderful evening of seeing again how volunteers and supporting agencies can make a tremendous difference in someone's life.  The medical alert dogs from D4D are provided at virtually no cost to diabetics in need.  So make it a date for Wednesday, August 19th to join us for an informative and fun evening.

Last June our speaker was Bob Nations, the owner and CEO of Senior Helpers.  Bob has a terrific stage presence and was just plain fun!  Bob gave us much information of how NOT to have to use his services as much as what Senior Helpers can do to help our family members in need of companion and personal care in addition to Alzheimer's and dementia care.  Senior Helpers Napa/Solano # is 707-251-1540.

A big thank you to our June volunteers for the Kaiser Cancer Survivors Celebration.  David R, Julie W and I really had fun working hard to spread the word.  The candy--always a hit, but a really great idea from Julie.  She handed out thank you notes for patients to use in thanking a medical worker, friend or family member that was a champion during their battle.  We connected with 2 ostomates that were in need of support and we hope to see Gary W at this next meeting.

Looking for an ostomy nurse NOT locked into an HMO?  We may finally have a source for you!  Kathy Westin, formerly of Queen of the Valley Hospital, has opened Napa Wound Healing Institute.  As far as she knows, she is the only certified ostomy nurse in Napa county.  I will be contacting Kathy to let her know that I believe she is also the only non-HMO one in Solano County as well.  This will be fantastic for all of us that do not have Kaiser!  Kathy has also become a Nurse Practitioner.  I hope to have more information about Kathy's practice at the meeting.  In the meantime, the contact information is:  Napa Wound Healing Institute, 3417 Valley Verde Drive, Napa, CA 94558, 707-266-1246.  Let's support Kathy and let her know how needed she is in our area.

Thanks to all of you who called me after the Pena Adobe 4th of July fire.  Yes, we were evacuated and slept in our car that night (the evacuation center cots were just way too low for my old knees).  Our court neighbors helped each other, kept together and stayed informed all night.  The fire engine crew from Suisun that protected our houses that night, were wonderful.  Scary to hear from them that the changing wind almost took us out two times, but luckily only a lot of ash and smoke to remove the next few days.  This was our 3rd large fire in the past 20 years and the scariest.  Thanks again for all your concern and calls.  Guess this has been a "lucky year" for us.  The earthquake damage repair will be finished at the end of October and we still have a house to repair.

Stay cool and keep happy.  Rochelle


Hernia and the Ostomate

by Eugene Broccolo; via Orange County (NY) Ostomy Support Group and Ostomy Outlook October 2007

Hernias can develop postoperatively through any surgical incision. Incisions that are not closed tightly are more prone to hernias. Colostomies represent surgical incisions that cannot be closed tightly because to do so could result in a stricture or narrowing of the bowel opening.

Hernias of colostomies, or pericolostomy hernias, can occur frequently. They can be apparent in the immediate postoperative period, or more often, develop years after the original surgery. They can be recognized as a bulge forming around the colostomy, most noticeably when the patient is standing. Good bowel function is dependent on good abdominal musculature and is especially dependent on the muscles around the colostomy site. Therefore, a colostomy hernia would give symptoms of poor colostomy functions, e.g., incomplete evacuation, difficulty in irrigation and discomfort during elimination.

Most hernias will cause fewer symptoms with some external support, e.g., an abdominal binder, but the colostomy itself and whatever appliance is used will interfere with good compression. Therefore, surgical repair has to be considered for the hernia.

Since the very same problems exist at the time of repair as were present at the original surgery, e.g., inability to obtain a tight closure, the recurrence rate for this type of hernia is much higher than with other hernias.

Because of the possibility that even in the best of circumstances a colostomy hernia can recur, the decision to proceed with surgery should be made only after consideration of all the factors, such as general health and nutrition, the degree of disability and the level of physical activity required.



Ostomy Tips from Ostomates (Reviewed by WOCNs)

Tulsa Ostomy Assn Newsletter

UOAA Update, October 2014

  1. Tea is an anti-spasmodic and soothing to an upset stomach. It also provides fluids containing electrolytes and potassium frequently lost from diarrhea.

  2. Avoid drinking while eating to allow the effluent to become thicker. Ingest liquids before and after a meal.

  3. Eating bran muffins is a tasty way for Colostomates to solve constipation problems.

  4. If stool sticks to the pouch and is hard to rinse out, use a surfactant/deodorizer or oil to let the pouch empty out easier.

  5. Ziploc® sandwich bags are useful for disposing of used pouches and help control odor in the trash.

  6. If it is safe to put in your mouth, it is safe to put in your pouch. Try green mint mouthwash as a pouch rinse.

  7. Diaper liners (e.g., Johnson and Johnson) are great as a barrier between the pouch and your skin or you may purchase a commercial pouch cover (or make one yourself).

  8. Price Pfister makes a small sprayer that can be attached to the bathroom sink faucet to assist with rinsing the end of the pouch.

  9. Cut the bottom 7 inches off a T-shirt and hem the unfinished edge. Attach Velcro to each end. You can wear this as a cummerbund with your pouch tucked inside for those intimate moments. Also, there are commercially made pouch covers. Back support belts work as well.

  10. Place a couple of squares of toilet paper in the toilet before emptying your pouch. This will take care of the "splash back"; or let it out very, very slowly.

  11. Laying a wafer on a heating pad or under your thigh for 10 - 15 minutes allows the material to soften, which helps with adhesion.

  12. Check with your pharmacist to see if your pills or capsules should be changed to liquids-   especially necessary for ileostomates. They tend to go through too fast and do not dissolve. 



From Basic Ostomy Skin Care-A Guide For Patients and Healthcare Provider’s by the WOCN Society


People who have a stoma often share many of the same questions and concerns.

This best practice document provides answers to some of the common questions

that people ask about the day to day care of the stoma and the surrounding skin. The answers are directed to the person who has a stoma but may also be helpful for the nurse as a teaching tool.

People with a stoma often worry that their skin may become irritated from the stool,

urine, or pouching system. It is important to treat the skin gently, protect it from stool,urine, and chemicals, and use products correctly to decrease the chance for

skin problems.


The basic rule is to

keep it simple.

Understand the reasons for doing what you do. Follow your Wound, Ostomy, Continence (WOC) Nurse orhealth care provider’s recommendations and the directions from the pro

duct manufacturers. When fewer products are used on the skin, there is a smaller chance

for developing skin problems.

If you have questions about the information in this document, problems with leakage, or skin problems around the stoma, contact your WOC Nurse or your

health care provider.




JUNE 2015

DATE: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17, 2015 7:00PM

PROGRAM: BOB NATIONS, CEO, SENIOR HELPERS

REFRESHMENTS: JOHNNIE ARMSTRONG

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS

 

Ten (new) Commandments for Ostomates
from Houston (TX) Ostomy Association and Ostomy Outlook February 2007

  1. Thou shalt allow thyself to be sad, or angry, or depressed on occasion. Who said you always have to have a good attitude.

  2. Thou shalt not let the above emotions become a way of life.

  3. Thou shalt seek help, education, and support if thine unhappy emotions overcome thee.

  4. Thou shalt learn to care for thy ostomy. Letting others do it for you, if you are physically able, is a cop-out.

  5. Thou shalt seek out thy WOC (ET) nurse if thou art not satisfied with thine products.

  6. Thou shalt not hide thyself away. Get out and do the things you used to do. You can.

  7. Thou shalt not be ashamed.

  8. Thou shalt cultivate a sense of humor about thine ostomy. There are worse things. Far worse.

  9. Thou shalt set an example to the non-ostomy world. An example of triumph over adversity, courage over pity, and pride over embarrassmen 

  10. Thou shalt help other ostomates. Join your local UOAA group, donate money, volunteer your time.


From UOAA Update

*Save the date for Conference 2015-St. Louis, MO, Hyatt Regency at the Arch, Sept.1-6, 2015*  A suggestion for your ASG to help members attend-have a 50/50 drawing at each meeting to help support a member that would like to attend the conference.  I have said this many times--once you have attended a UOAA conference, you really do make great friends and want to attend the next conference. Check out pictures of past conferences on our web site, and you will see that we not only have informational sessions, but we also have fun!


Hypercalcemia
By Lisa Andrews, Med, RD, LD — The Phoenix

and “The Pouch” Ostomy Support Group, Northern Virginia October 2014

I have been diagnosed with hypercalcemia. All usual tests have come back normal. My doctors are now thinking it might be dehydration. Have you heard of this in ileostomates?

Thanks for your question. I am sorry to read that you have been diagnosed with hypercalcemia. But the good news is that it sounds as though your doctors have ruled out more concerning causes. Dehydration can be the culprit because salts and electrolytes such as calcium chloride will be too concentrated when water levels in the blood are too low.

Causes — Hypercalcemia is defined as a serum calcium level of 10.5 mg/dL or greater, though some labs may identify a level of 10.3 as elevated. The main cause of hypercalcemia is primary hyper -parathyroidism, meaning an overactive parathyroid gland or glands. When a parathyroid gland/s is overstimulated, it secretes too much parathyroid hormone, which can cause an increase in serum calcium.

Surgery to remove the parathyroid gland is typically advised. Hyper-thyroidism can happen at any age, but post-menopausal women are most susceptible. Other causes of hypercalcemia include malignancy (cancer), chronic kidney failure, vitamin D toxicity, lung diseases such as TB and sarcoidosis, hyperthyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and medications such as lithium and diuretics.

Dehydration and Ileostomies — Dehydration is actually quite common in individuals with ileostomies. A recent study found that close to 17% of ileostomates get readmitted to the hospital after surgery related to dehydration.

Patients that received diuretics post op (AKA “water pills” that are used to reduce fluid volume) were more likely to experience dehydration as were individuals whose surgeries were performed in warm summer months.

We lose bodily fluid through tears, sweat, urine and stool. Typically, the water we consume compensates for this loss. We become dehydrated if fluid loss is greater than fluid intake. A loss of fluid less than 1% of body weight is considered mild dehydration. It can typically be corrected by replacing lost fluid and salts (from food). A loss of 3 -5% of body weight is consistent with moderate dehydration and is more serious. Chronic or ongoing moderate dehydration may impact kidney function and potentially lead to the development of kidney stones. In fact, kidney stones can be more common in ileostomates due to increased intestinal losses of water and sodium bicarbonate. Severe dehydration occurs when there is more than 5% of body weight related to fluid loss. This is the most serious case of dehydration and may require hospitalization and treatment with intravenous fluids.

Fluid Intake — Inadequate fluid intake is one of the leading causes of dehydration. Patients with ileostomies should drink at least 64 oz. (8 cups) of water daily and avoid beverages containing caffeine. Sixty-four ounces is equivalent to two liters of fluid. An easy way to consume this much water is to consistently drink a standard 17 oz. bottle of water with meals (assuming three meals per day) and have a cup of water with snacks. Sports drinks, juice, milk and decaffeinated beverages can also help provide your daily fluid needs. Watery food like raw fruits and vegetables can also provide dietary fluid.

As many ileostomates do not absorb fluid and nutrients very well, fluid loss of over a quart of liquid stool in 24 hours may lead to dehydration. Diarrhea (frequent, watery or loose bowel movements in larger amounts than usual) may lead to dehydration. Food poisoning, intestinal flu, antibiotics and other medications may cause diarrhea as can food intolerance, such as lactose intolerance or gluten sensitivity.

Warning Signs — If diarrhea is frequent, keeping a diary including all foods, liquids and medications taken my help to pinpoint the cause. See your doctor if diarrhea is chronic. The first sign of dehydration is a dry mouth. More serious warning signs of dehydration may include fatigue, rapid heart rate, dizziness or light-headedness, dry mouth or low blood pressure. In addition, urine will also appear very dark or “tea colored” when you are severely dehydrated. Other causes of dehydration include fever, uncontrolled diabetes, excessive sweating or increased urination.

Individuals with ileostomies that exercise need to ensure adequate fluid intake to prevent dehydration. Consuming at least 16 oz. of water before exercise and 4 oz. of fluid for every 15 minutes during exercise can prevent dehydration.

Drinking adequate fluid after exercise (~2 cups) will also replace fluids lost from sweat and respiration.

Finally, it’s possible that excessive dietary calcium could be the cause of your hypercalcemia. Calcium may be “hidden” in calcium-fortified foods and liquids (such as bread, cereal, soy milk and orange juice). Multi-vitamins containing vitamin D and/or calcium can also impact serum calcium levels as vitamin D increases calcium absorption in the gut. Vitamin D is found in dairy products including milk, cheese and yogurt, but other foods on the market may be fortified with vitamin D as well. I hope you found this information helpful.

Thanks to BOA Friends Together, Baltimore Ostomy Association, Baltimore, MD

Abdominal Noises
via GAOA & Chattanooga Ostomy Association Coalesce Newsletter--UOAA Update, October 2014

Abdominal noises happen! However, as ostomates, we are embarrassed and wonder if something is wrong. It is usually "sound and fury, signifying nothing" important. Any of the following may be the cause: 

  1. You are hungry. Peristalsis goes on whether there is anything to move through or not.  

    Empty guts growl. Eat a snack between meals. Or consider four small meals a day.

  2. You are nervous, so peristalsis is increased.

    Try to slow down. Try to eliminate some stress (especially at meal times).

  3. Coffee and tea, cola and beer-all stimulate peristalsis. Beverages consumed on an empty stomach will produce gurgles as peristalsis redoubles its movements. 

    Add a little bit of food with your beverages. Try some crackers and/or bread.

  4. Eating a high-fiber diet produces gas, so rumbles increase. 

    Mix with other foods. Reduce amount of insoluble fiber. Switch to more soluble fiber.

  5. Intestines do not digest starches and sugars as easily as proteins and fats.

    Reduce the amount of carbohydrates that cause you trouble. Mix with proteins and fats.


Seeking Medical Assistance
via San Diego Newsletter-UOAA Update, October 2014 

The most common problem after any ostomy surgery is the development of a hernia around the stoma site. This is manifested as a bulge in the skin around the stoma, irrigation difficulty, and partial obstruction.

Heavy lifting should be avoided immediately after surgery. Also, you should call the doctor or ostomy nurse if any of the following occur: 

  • Severe cramps lasting more than 2 or 3 hours.

  • Unusual odor lasting more than a week.

  • Unusual change in stoma size and appearance.

  • Obstruction at the stoma and/or prolapse of the stoma (that is, it has fallen out of place).

  • Excessive bleeding from the stoma opening or a moderate amount in the pouch.

  • Severe injury or cut to the stoma.

  • Continuous bleeding at the junction between the stoma and skin.

  • Watery discharge lasting more than five or six hours.

  • Chronic skin irritation.

  • Stenosis (narrowing) of the stoma. 

Your ostomy nurse (WOCN) is helpful in managing complications, should they arise.


MAY 2015



DATE: WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2015 6:30 PM – BIRTHDAY POTLUCK!!!!!


PROGRAM: JULIE BISHOP, CONVATEC


REFRESHMENTS: OAS PROVIDING CHICKEN, DRINKS, PLATES & NAPKINS


PLEASE BRING AN APPETIZER, SIDE DISH OR DESSERT


WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR. LOOK FOR SIGNS

SEPTEMBER 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM:  SHARING REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEERWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.AUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.                MEETING ROOMS A & BAUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.CHAPTER  NOTESSEPTEMBER 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM:  SHARING REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEERWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.AUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.                MEETING ROOMS A & BAUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.CHAPTER  NOTESSEPTEMBER 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM:  SHARING REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEERWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.AUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.                MEETING ROOMS A & BAUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.CHAPTER  NOTES

FROM THE PRESIDENT


Our April 15th meeting was wonderful. Those of you who were unable to make it , missed a good one! Kristina Boggs the Community Liaison for Kindred at Home was very informative. Their staff provides home health care, caregiver services and most important to those of us with an ostomy – wound care. Kristina is very familiar with the needs of an ostomate. And she is quite versed on how to apply for reimbursement from Medicare , insurance and other funding sources. Home health care is not a substitute for family care – it is a supplement. Patients over 70 must have a primary family caregiver, a goal & care plan for wound management. Must be considered home bound (takes a great effort to get out). The care improvements must be verified every 90 days. Kindred at Home also can provide a non-medical caregiver that can be hired for assistance to appointments, shopping, etc. They require 24 hour notice and must be booked for a minimum of 3 hours. This is a great service for those who do not need a nurse, just transportation and mobility help.

Kindred at Home has their Solano office in Vacaville. You can contact them at 707-447-9600.

Our June meeting speaker will be Annette Vance of Senior Helpers. Annette will cover their services and talk about the Veterans help program and the Alzheimers walk this October in Suisun City.

The Ostomy Association of Solano is celebrating our “birthday” this meeting. The OAS is very proud to have served Solano ostomates for over 30 years. Our potluck is a fun evening of food, conversation, laughter and this year, we have a speaker! Julie Bishop from Convatec will be here. Convatec is one of the largest ostomy product manufacturers and Julie will be showing us their newest products. There will be samples, information packets and request forms for appliance samples. Our potluck starts early – 6:30PM, May 20th. See ya there!

A Great Lesson on Stress

(From Greater Atlanta Ostomy Assoc; and North

Central OK Ostomy Outlook, May 2013 via Regina Ostomy News, Nov/Dec. 2014 and from Inside Out, Winnipeg Ostomy Association,

November/December, 2014.)

A young lady confidently walked around the room with a raised glass of water while explaining stress management to an audience. Everyone knew she was going to ask the ultimate question, “half empty or half full?” She fooled them all… “How heavy is this glass of water?” she inquired with a smile.

Answers called out ranged from 8 to 20 ounces (250 to 600 grams). She replied, “The absolute weight doesn’t matter. It depends on how long I hold it.” “If I hold it for a minute, that’s not a problem. If I hold it for an hour, I’ll have an ache in my arm. If I hold it for a day, you’ll have to call an ambulance. In each case it’s the same weight, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes.”

She continued, “…and that’s the way it is with stress. If we carry our burdens all the time, sooner or later, as the burden becomes increasingly heavy, we won’t be able to carry on. As with the glass of water, you have to put it down for a while and rest before holding it again. When we’re refreshed, we can carry on with the burden… holding stress longer and better each time practiced.



Keep Hydrated

Reprinted by permission of Hollister Incorporated. From the

Secure Start Newsletter for People with Ostomies, Summer, 2014, pp. 1-3

Bass fisherman, Matt Elkins reels in advice for people with urostomies.

I have always loved fishing, and I’m sure it started as a child. My mom’s favorite story is when she strapped a lifejacket on me at three years old and let me go to the local pond. I came back, proud as could be, with a little fish in a bucket, and she had no idea how I could have caught it.

That was just the start of my passion with fishing, and when my buddies invited me to join the local bassclub—I was hooked.

Bass fishing tournaments are timed competitions. They’re fast-paced, strenuous, and unbelievably exhilarating. I’m on my feet for 8 to 12 hours a day, running from the front casting deck to the rear casting deck of the boat.

So, I don’t have time to worry about having an ileostomy or urostomy.

Let me give you a little background. You see, I grew up with an ileostomy, so having to wear a pouching system was really second nature to me. I played sports like everybody else, and nobody knew I had an ostomy. But when I had my urostomy surgery in 2013 I had a lot to learn, especially as a fisherman who spends hours on the water in the hot sun.

What I learned very quickly, is that it’s all about keeping hydrated. I know I’m starting to get dehydrated when my urine becomes a darker color and I have low output. I know I’m headed for full-blown dehydration when I get headaches and my calf starts to cramp every time I step on the electric trolling motor. When leg cramping begins, I know I’d better drink something right away. For an 8-hour tournament day I bring at leastthree, 32 oz bottles of Gatorade or Powerade and good old-fashioned water. I’m pretty diligent about drinking them because they replenish electrolytes and give me the energy I need to keep going. I’ve developed my own routine for drinking them because it’s easy to forget to keep hydrated when I’m concentrating on the

tournament at hand. It’s simple. I just keep a cold bottle next to the driver’s seat so when I move from location to location I see it and remember to drink.

Since I compete both regionally and nationally, bass fishing tournaments take me all over the country and into parts of Canada. My first trip since my urostomy surgery was this past March to Lake Okeechobee, Florida. I knew I had to drink more water because of the heat, but what I didn’t know was that when I perspire, I have to change my pouching system more often. So, I make sure to bring plenty of supplies with me. In fact, I keep an extra appliance in the first aid kit of my boat. Luckily, I’ve never had to use it. I also wear special lightweight fishing clothing made with SPF protection, which keeps me cool as well. Just like I’ve figured out

what to eat to keep my ileostomy happy on a fishing trip, I now know how much I have to drink to manage my urostomy. My advice to folks with a urostomy is to set yourself a daily fluid intake goal that will keep you adequately hydrated throughout the day. If you’re active like me, sports drinks are a good choice to replenish your electrolytes and give you energy.

I plan to fish the next five Michigan division Bass Fishing League events on Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair, and a BASS Northern Open division event to be held on Lake St. Clair in September. Nothing is going to stop me from catching those bass, and you shouldn't let anything stop you either.


Somebody to Love

By Barbara Skoglund of Maplewood, MN,

Ostomy Myths Series (Printed in the UOA Chicago newsletter, The New Outlook, Feb, 2013

We (UOA Chicago) thought that our members would like to read an updated version of this classic article on ostomy surgery.

This article is a frank exposition written by a young woman who suffered from the humiliation of ulcerative colitis and was then cured when she had her colon removed and was given a permanent ileostomy. People with other types of ostomies will find this article fascinating with many applications relating generally to life with an ostomy.Green Bay Area Ostomy Support Group Page 5 of 12 January/February 2015

As an ulcerative colitis patient for more than 14 years, I became so ill that my colon had to be removed. I was so afraid of having an ostomy that I postponed treatment and nearly died. Knowing my feelings about ostomies, my doctor performed a rarely done straight ileoanal anastomosis. He could not build a J-pouch for me. My body would not qualify.

I lived three years of hell with that “straight shot” and had an ileostomy in December 1996. It was the best Christmas gift I ever gave myself! I had many misconceptions about living with an ostomy, and I frequently encounter others with those same misconceptions. After one person too many told me that it would be better to be dead than to live like me, I decided to start a series of short articles covering the facts and fiction of ostomy life.

A couple of times during my single days, I placed personal ads as a way to find potential mates. Before I would write my ad, I would sit down and list all the qualities I was looking for in a mate. I wanted a partner who was smart and funny, someone who shared my interests, who shared my values, etc. Nowhere on that list did it mention that my partner must not have an ostomy. I used to think that no one out there would be interested in me if I had an ostomy. I was convinced that people with ostomies sat home, smelled badly, wore baggy clothes, and were lonely and friendless. You would think I would still harbor this myth since my first fiancé took a walk when I had my temporary ileostomy while my ileoanal anastomosis was healing. To tell the truth, it was pretty clear that we did not split over how I went to the bathroom. We split because we were not right for each other.

I have since found my soul mate and life partner. He could not care less how I go to the toilet. What he cares about is that I am healthy. You see, he loves me regardless of my possession of a butt hole or not.

Consider this question: do single people with ostomies have a more difficult time with dating? The true answer is that some do and some do not. Many are very confident and date like any other self-assured person. I have found that those who do not date are too afraid to get out there and try. It is all in their head and not on their tummy. Yes, I would not be surprised if an ostomy challenged someone's casual exploits—you know what I mean. However, if you are interested in finding a life partner who loves you, the possession of an ostomy will not stop you. Realistically, some people prefer to marry college graduates, some prefer a mate of the same religion, some prefer black people, some white people, some want someone younger, some the same age. In America, you should choose the person you want. Do not settle.

However, he/she has a choice to pick you or not also, regardless of you having an ostomy or not. Many people use an ostomy as an excuse for failed relationships. It is rarely true. Research shows that people with ostomies have fewer divorces than the population in general! If anything, an ostomy may be a good test of what a potential mate is really interested in. I never think to myself, "Will you still need me when I'm 64?" I know my husband is with me forever.



Ostomy Hints

(From The New Outlook,UOA Chicago, April, 2013)

• If you have a difficult time remembering the exact day you put on your pouching system, write the day of the month you changed it right on the pouch or barrier with a pen.

• Do not keep a lifetime supply of ostomy supplies on hand. Manufacturers are always making some improvement on the products they make. You want to be able to take advantage of these . . . so let your supplier keep the inventory.

• Most people with ostomies should keep fats of all kinds to a minimum. Fats induce an increased flow of bile into the intestines and make body wastes liquid and harder to control. They also tend to produce gas.

• Do not spread paste on the entire back of the skin barrier; it will produce poor results. Use paste only sparingly to fill uneven areas and around the stoma. Paste is a great filler if used correctly.

• After bathing or showering with the skin barrier off, allow the peristomal skin to cool for a few seconds to close the pores before putting on a new pouching system. Only put an adhesive barrier on dry, that is, bone-dry skin.

• After surgery, you were advised to chew-chew-chew and to drink-drink-drink. It all still applies. Chew food thoroughly and never pass a water fountain without drinking.

• Do not try to set a world record for the longest time between pouching system changes and/or emptying the pouch. Therein lies the way to some of the most spectacular messes you have ever seen.

• Do not be so rigid about your stoma management program that the absence of one item throws you.

• Do not stay home. Travel and have fun. However, when you do, do not put all of your pouching systems in a single suitcase that you check through the airline. Always bring some pouching changes in your carry-on luggage.

• Do not worry about accidents and problems that may never happen. Do not put limitations on yourself just because you have a stoma. You can do most anything anyone else can. An ostomy is seldom a reason for not doing something, although it is a good excuse.



Proper Care & Storage of Ostomy Supplies

from an article by Teresa Murphy-Stowers, Fort Worth, TX; via Dallas (TX) Ostomatic News

Ostomy supplies are not inexpensive, to say the least. So, it is important to understand how to apply them properly with the fewest errors possible and equally important to know how to take care of and store supplies until use. Proper care may avert the need to discard unused supplies and thus be as economical as possible.

  • Be sure to read carefully the instruction sheet included in the box or guidelines on the container for specific recommendations for a given product.

  • Generally, all ostomy supplies should be stored in a cool, dry location. Too much heat can melt or weaken many of the materials used in ostomy wafers, pouches, and accessory items. Avoid leaving supplies in a hot car or in direct sunlight.

  • Review instructions periodically to refresh your memory and to see if any recommendations have changed over time.

  • Keep supplies such as wafers and pouches in their original box. By doing so, you save the brand name, product identification number, and the lot and date information for those items. Perhaps you will never need this information, but in the event you do, the box you have saved will provide the information you (or someone helping you) will need for reorder or to report any quality control problems.

  • Some ostomy supplies do have a “shelf life.” Be sure to check for dates that may be recorded on their containers. If you find you have a box with an expired date, check with the manufacturer, your local supplier, or an Ostomy nurse for advice on usage.

  • While you do want to keep a “stock” of supplies so you are always prepared to change out your system, avoid the practice of stockpiling too much so your reserve will be as fresh as possible. This, of course, depends on factors such as the availability, proximity to a local supply house, or shipping issues.

  • Purchase supplies from a trusted vendor—one you know will provide good service as well as stock/ship current stock.

Reporting Defective supplies

  • If you determine your supplies are defective in spite of proper use and storage, contact the manufacturer at their toll free number to report the problem and receive product replacement or adjustment.

  • Let your supply source know of your report to the manufacturer. They need to be aware of problems; however, the complaint needs to be directed to the manufacturer to ensure the defect can be addressed.


Hernia and the Ostomate

by Eugene Broccolo; via Orange County (NY) Ostomy Support Group

Hernias can develop postoperatively through any surgical incision. Incisions that are not closed tightly are more prone to hernias. Colostomies represent surgical incisions that cannot be closed tightly because to do so could result in a stricture or narrowing of the bowel opening.

Hernias of colostomies, or pericolostomy hernias, can occur frequently. They can be apparent in the immediate postoperative period, or more often, develop years after the original surgery. They can be recognized as a bulge forming around the colostomy, most noticeably when the patient is standing. Good bowel function is dependent on good abdominal musculature and is especially dependent on the muscles around the colostomy site. Therefore, a colostomy hernia would give symptoms of poor colostomy functions, e.g., incomplete evacuation, difficulty in irrigation and discomfort during elimination.

Most hernias will cause fewer symptoms with some external support, e.g., an abdominal binder, but the colostomy itself and whatever appliance is used will interfere with good compression. Therefore, surgical repair has to be considered for the hernia.

Since the very same problems exist at the time of repair as were present at the original surgery, e.g., inability to obtain a tight closure, the recurrence rate for this type of hernia is much higher than with other hernias.

Because of the possibility that even in the best of circumstances a colostomy hernia can recur, the decision to proceed with surgery should be made only after consideration of all the factors, such as general health and nutrition, the degree of disability and the level of physical activity required.


SEPTEMBER 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM:  SHARING REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEERWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.CHAPTER  NOTES

SEPTEMBER 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM:  SHARING REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEERWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.CHAPTER  NOTES

APRIL 2015

 

 

DATE: WEDNESDAY 15, , 2015  7:00 PM

PROGRAM: 

REFRESHMENTS:

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

                   MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR.  LOOK FOR SIGNS

 

 

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor. 

To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com

OSTOMY TERMINOLOGY

Via UOAA Update November 2014, reprinted from

Contra Costomy News April 2015

 

If you are reading this newsletter, chances are you or someone close to you has had an intestinal or urinary diversion.  This is the broadest terminology for this type of surgeries we are all dealing with at various stages, whether just starting out or successfully managing for a number of years.  Quite simply, our body’s waste management system has been diverted or changed from its normal course.  If you have an intestinal diversion, the way your body excretes (or passes) solid waste has been changed.  If you have a urinary diversion, the normal flow or urine from the kidneys to the bladder has been interrupted.

These two types of diversions can be further subdivided into continent and incontinent diversions:  *Continent Diversion:  A continent diversion n is one where the elimination of solid waste or urine is controlled.  The control is made possible through the construction of an internal reservoir ( a surgically created pouch inside your body) to hold the feces or urine.  In some continent diversions, elimination is done by inserting a catheter to drain the reservoir; in others, elimination is done more normally through the anus or urethra.  Fecal diversions that are drained with a catheter include the Kock (or K) pouch and Barnett variant of the K pouch (BCIR).  Urinary diversions drained with a catheter include Kock and Indiana Pouches.  Fecal diversions that eliminate through the anus include the ileoanal reservoir (aka pull-tahrough or pelvic pouch, with J, S, and W variants, often referred to generically as “J-pouch”).  Urinary diversions that eliminate through the urethra include the orthotopic neobladder.

*Incontinent Diversion:  The elimination of either fecal waste or urine is not controlled in this type of diversion and requires the patient to wear a pouching system.  An ostomy is usually considered to be an incontinent procedure.

*Ostomy”  An ostomy refers to a surgically created opening in the body for the discharge of body wastes and allows for the formation of a stoma pouch (BCIR). 

 

                THE OVERACTIVE ILEOSTOMY

UOAA Update 11/12

Edited by Bobbie Brewer

From Contra Costomy News March 2015

 

An overactive ileostomy can result from a variety of problems.  If the small bowel is inflamed due to Crohn’s, output will be profuse.  If there is a narrowing of the small bowel close to the stoma, where the leostomy goes through the abdominal wall, a pressure backup can lead to explosive high output.

Any food that has a laxative effect should be eliminated, or at best, kept to a miniumu.   People with lactose intolerance will have a high output if they use any kind of milk product, including powdered milk, which is found in many prepared foods.

Excessive drinking of fluids will also increase the ileostomy output.  An ostomate who has had their gallbladder removed may have increased output.  Medicines to counteract bile salts can be used if the problem is related to gallbladder removal.  Many prescriptions and OTC drugs list diarrhea as a side effect.

The ostomate should work with his physician to evaluate the problem.  Once disease can be ruled out,  therapeutic emphasis can be placed on diet, utilizing foods that decrease output.

 

 

 

 

URINARY DIVERSION PROBLEMS

                By Clark H. Hyde, MD

From Contra Costomy News March 2015

 

Kidney infections:  Bacteria getting in the kidneys cause fever and back pains which persists until medication is taken for bacteria.  It is necessary to take periodic examinations and x-rays and a culture (do not take specimen from the bag but directly from the stoma).  Drink plenty of water.  At least 8 glasses a day.

When PH is all right you will have less trouble with skin and odor.  Cranberry juice is suggested or 500 mg of vitamin C twice a day to keep PH at correct level.  It is necessary to get plenty of rest and not work until you are exhausted.

Obstructions:  An obstruction squeezes up the stoma and finally cuts off the flow or urine.  The cause is usually a bad stoma in the first place and a large weight gain.  Kidney stones are another problem with urinary diversion as well as other types of ostomies.  The most common cause of stones is too much calcium, therefore DRINKING WATER IS IMPORTANT!

 

RECTAL STUMP COMPLICATIONS

By Amber J. Tesca, Ask.com

From Contra Costomy News March 2015

 

Some people who have a colostomy or an ileostomy still have part of all of their rectum; referred to as a “rectal stump”.  The rectum is living tissue and will continue to produce mucus.  This mucus may leak out of the rectum at times, especially if it tends to be of a watery consistency.  Some gauze or a sanitary napkin worn in the undergarments may help to catch unexpected leaks.  It may also help to periodically sit on the toilet to try to expel the mucus.  If the amount of mucus is excessive, particularly bothersome, has a foul odor, or is green or yellow in color, it may need to investigated by a physician.  Suppositories may be a solution.

 

 

MURPHY’S LESSER KNOWN LAWS

UOAA UPDATE Feb 2013 via Cedar Rapids/IA City 5/09

From Contra Costomy News March 2015

 

Light travels faster than sound.  This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

He who laughs last, thinks slowest.

Change is inevitable, except from a vending machine.

Nothing is fool proof to a sufficiently talented fool.

The 50-50-90 rule:  anytime you have a 50-50 chance of getting something right, there is a 90% probability you’ll get it wrong.

If you lined up all the cars in the world end to end, someone would be stupid enough to pass them, five or six at a time…on a hill…on a curve…in the fog.

If the shoe fits, get another one just like it.

A flashlight if a case for holding dead batteries.

The shin bone is a device for finding furniture in the dark.

FEBRUARY 2015

 

 

DATE: WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2015  7:00 PM

PROGRAM:  LIFE CARE PLANNING, Kathy Widner, Kaiser Health Education Dept.

REFRESHMENTS: Brenda Gorzynski

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

                   MEETING ROOMS A&B, FIRST FLOOR.  LOOK FOR SIGNS

 

 

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor. 

To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com

FROM THE PRESIDENT

 

January’s meeting was lively and fun.  Even though I was unable to secure the announced speaker, we had an excellent night of introductions of new members and attendees.  Our sharing session was informative and helpful to both the new and veteran ostomates.  And the refreshments supplied by Julie were a variety of deliciousness. One of our newer members, Johnnie A.  won the door prize.  Jim S. won the stoma pool and donated the full amount to the Koins for Kids (UOAA Youth Rally).  We are still working on having some meetings in 2015 in the Vacaville/Fairfield area and possibly on a different day to accommodate those of you who are unable to attend the 3rd Wednesday of the month in Vallejo.  More information on that will be coming. I hope many of you can attend this meeting to receive valuable information and materials to help you and those closest to you understand and proceed in your advance care planning.  It is so important to understand the possible, future health choices in accordance with your values and goals.  Let’s start 2015 by” gettin’ it done”!  We look forward to seeing you on the 18th. 

 

Dues forms will be mailed out this month.  Please return promptly, thank you.

 

 

Helpful Hints

from AICM-Montreal Nov-Dec 2014 Newsletter

UOAA Update January 2015

Posture Matters: When you return from the hospital, you will be feeling sore and uncomfortable. You may be anxious about the front of your body getting bumped, or self-conscious about the stoma which can lead to a habit of hunching over to “guard” that area. Try to focus on keeping your head up and your back straight.

Walking Works: Don’t lie or sit about all day. Walking helps restore lost muscle tone, gets your circulation going and just generally perks you up. Get up and walk several times a day.

Stomahesive Paste: If your Stomahesive Paste becomes hard and will not push through the end of the tube, heat a glass of water filled half way in the microwave for 45 seconds. Remove and place the tube cap down in the water. Let stand for a few minutes and dry. You should now be able to get the paste out easily.

Vitamins: Vitamins should be taken on a full stomach. Otherwise, they irritate the lining of the stomach and produce the sensation of feeling hungry.

Diuretics: Try strong-brewed tea before the purchase of a diuretic. Hot tea twice a day will wake up your sluggish kidneys.

Juice vs Gatorade: Tomato juice provides as much sodium and five times more potassium and is a low cost alternative to Gatorade. Orange juice is another alternative providing the same amount of sodium and 15 times the amount of potassium to Gatorade.

 

UROSTOMY Tips & Advice

From Metro Maryland Panel at July 13, 2104 meeting, Metro Maryland

 

Comments from Carlos Caban:

I was diagnosed with bladder cancer in 1999.  While checking out three surgeons, I visited Metro Maryland to discuss living with a ostomy.  Then in January 2000, at Washington Hospital Center, Dr. Verghese performed my urostomy surgery with an ileal conduit.  I followed up for several years with a urologist and also with a kidney doctor (nephrologoist) because I have have only one kidney.  The other was removed due to cancer.

My adaption and habits are as follows:  I needed a convex bag and started with a two-piece Hollister.  Had to remember to twist the exit valve shut!  Tried Stomahesive tape for a while, but eventually moved to Stomahesive strips that are moldable around the edge of my appliance.

At night I use a Urocare Urinary Drainage Bottle (#4100).  It holds two lites and is anchored with an elastic leg band.

I went back to work part-time after a while.  Had two accidents at work and had to go home (nearby).  Learned 1) wear dark pants and have extra pants with me, 2) a new routine for going to the bathroom.  To do an hourly bathroom run in the morning and after meals.  If in meetings, I excuse myself as needed. 

Moved to a one piece Hollister Premier (inside cloth lining) with one inch belt for a little security.  Later moved to Nu-Form Support Belt by Nu-Hope (their phone assistance is excellent) and I felt better for my sports activities.

Gradually wore the Ostomy bag for more and more days.  I tried different tapes around the edges.  Used Secure Comfort tape for years, but recently moved to Colopast Brava Elastic Barrier Strips ( half circle) which extend wear a few days.

Issues I was not prepared for at first:  a) Make sure that bag is stretched all the way down your leg so it fills evenly.  b) Yeast infection  (saw Carol at WHC). c) Urinary infection with very dark urine ( saw my urologist).  d) A hernia.  (worked out in the gym and played tennis.  Got a special Nu-Hope hernia belt (tried several sizes/types).  e) Pin hole leaks (used paper towels in the bathroom padding and went more frequently until I got home).  f) Skin problems:  used powder and skin barrier wipes (non-alcoholic) and Nexcare Skin Crack Care from Walgreens.

Auto Travel Tips:  A) Stop every hour. B) Keep an empty water bottle in the car in case you cannot make it to the bathroom due to traffic delays (have used once).  I have not used extra leg bags attached to my urostomy but bought one to try it.

Educational materials and catalogs have improved significantly.  There is now a lot of information on the web.

 

 

Puns for Educated Minds

From THE POUCH, Ostomy Support Group of North Virginia, Feb. 2015

Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.

Atheism is a non-prophet organization.

Two hats were hanging on a hat rack in the hallway. One hat said to the other: “You stay here; I’ll go on a head.”

More Puns for Educated Minds

I wondered why the baseball kept getting bigger. Then it hit me.

A sign on the lawn at a drug rehab center said: “Keep off the Grass.”

The midget fortune-teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large.

The soldier who survived mustard gas and pepper spray is now a seasoned veteran.

In a democracy it’s your vote that counts. In feudalism it’s your count that votes.

A vulture boards an airplane, carrying two dead raccoons. The flight attendant looks at him and says, “I’m sorry, sir, only one carrion allowed per passenger.”

Did you hear about the Buddhist who refused Novocain during a root canal? His goal: transcend dental medication.

 

 

A message from President Susan Burns,

My hope is that your Holiday Season was a happy and healthy one, and 2015 will be a wonderful year for you, our Affiliated Support Groups (ASGs) and partners.

Over the past month we have been reviewing our Strategic Plan from 2014, and how we can implement the awareness programs for your UOAA and our ASGs. The Management Board of Directors (MBoD) is meeting in mid-January to continue to strengthen these programs.

We welcome Ival Secrest as the new Chair for the ASG Advisory Board, which works directly with new and existing affiliated support groups and the Management Board of Directors (MBoD). Also, Al Nua will be chairing the Ambassador Program, which will identify members who volunteer to help support our ASG’s regionally.

We welcome two newly elected Directors, Cheryl Ory and Al Nua, and a new 2nd Vice President, Joan McGorry, to the MBoD. They bring leadership and experience to our Board.

Our Social Media team, chaired by Doug Yakich, has been working on our “likes” on Facebook and keeping people informed via all social media. Doug has formed a new team (Alyssa Zeldenrust, Elizabeth Cutler, Keagan Lynggard, and Sierra Cabezas) to assist in ostomy awareness. The 2nd Annual 5K Ostomy Awareness Run/Walk will be held again in North Carolina this coming October 3rd, in conjunction with World Ostomy Day. We hope to have additional walks in other regions of the country as well. Please contact the office if this is something your ASG is interested in helping us create.

Doug Shefsky, our Advocacy Chair, is also working with a new committee including Past President of WOCN Society, Margaret Goldberg, CWOCN, to continue working with ASG members in various states to communicate with their legislators to keep ostomy supplies issues in the forefront. A continuing goal is to pass additional ostomy supply coverage related Bills. As always, the committee is looking for anyone interested in leading advocacy efforts within their state.

Our conference committee Chair, Ken Aukett, and speaker chair, Millie Parker, are working on our 2015 “Gateway to a New Life” conference to be held September 1-6, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch in St. Louis, MO. We are holding a full day of ASG leadership sessions on Wednesday, September 2, and you will need to sign up for this on the registration form. Attending a conference can help with strengthening your ASG by offering educational sessions, full exhibit hall, seeing old friends, and meeting new ones. Check our website www.ostomy.org for updated information on sessions, speakers and fun activities. Our online registration form is on our website now— 2015 Conference Registration Form.

Happy New Year to All — Susan


JANUARY 2015

DATE: WEDNESDAY, JAN. 21, 2015

TIME: 7:00PM

PROGRAM:

REFRESHMENTS:

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A & B FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the  materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.
To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com

FROM THE PRESDIENT

What a wonderful way to end the year with a great turnout of 27 friends, good food, laughter, remembrance and giving,  The dining was expansive – in more ways than one.  The chicken was delish as usual and side dishes from our great cooks were tempting as always.  And then there were the “expansive” deserts.  We had everything – brownies, lemon bars, cookies, a blues “Frozen” cake and more cake.  It was delightful to get to visit with everyone and introduce our newest visitors to the group. 

Our silent auction was quite a success.  The bid sheets wee a source of great fun as the bidding wars for the nuts and the gift cards were a springboard of giggles and laughs as the battle continued until the closing countdown.  We raised $176.  And the Kids for Kamp Can brought in enough to raise the total for Youth Rally to over $200!  That’s almost half of the cost of one camper at the Youth Rally.  So generous of all of you who attended.

We hope 2015 to be a year of growth in helping those who have had or will have an ostomy.  Already I’ve had 6 phone visitations and hope we can spread our outreach further this year.  Thank you all for your support of our mission.  May 2015 be a year of good health and enjoyment of life for all of us.

 

IS SITTING THE NEW SMOKING?

From ROSEBUD REVIEW, CVOA, Eau Claire, WI January 2015

 

If you’ve heard the phrase “Sitting is the new smoke”, you may have dismissed it as an exaggeration.  After all, a mere sampling of the ill effects of smoking includes: increased risk of heart disease and stroke risk by two to four times, as well as greatly increasing the risk of lung disease and cancer.

Is sitting as bad as that?  If you spend a lot of your day sitting, it may be.  Most people don’t smoke, but everybody sits.  Most sit for too long each day.  Many U.S. workers sit for 15 hours a day.  In the past 15 years, a wave of research has shed new light on sitting as a serious risk factor that snuck up on modern society.

Throughout most of human history, sitting or lying down has been a way to rest between long bouts of movement.  For many people today, the equation has been reversed.  Cars, email, home entertainment, computers, office work and labor-saving devices have made for a life of sitting that’s interrupted by small bouts of movement and sometimes exercise.

One study of 2,286 adults age 60 and older found that, on average, this group spent nine hours a day being sedentary,  meaning sitting or lying down, during an average of 14 hours of wake time.

If you’re not very active, it makes sense that health risks are higher since you are more likely to be overweight and generally unfit.  However, a lot of sitting appears to be just as harmful to those who aren’t overweight and who are generally healthy and nearly as harmful even among those who routinely exercise.

The health toll:  There’s a reason why sitting and reclining feel restful.  When you sit, muscle activity effectively stops.  If your body needs rest, that is a great thing.  However, when you get too much muscle rest, bad things start to happen.

Although the biology of sitting and its effects on the body isn’t fully understood, it appears that a key function of your muscles is to soak up blood sugar and blood fats for energy use.

When you move around, or even just stand, the largest muscles of your body are actively working to keep you upright and moving sucking up fats and sugar from your bloodstream.

When you sit for too long, blood sugar and blood fat levels don’t return to normal as readily.  Over time, this may contribute to undesirable cholesterol levels, development of diabetes, storage of excess energy as body fat, damage to blood vessels cardiovascular disease such as stroke and heart disease and other unwanted biological changes.  Thirty-four chronic conditions and illnesses have been associated with excess sitting.

One recent study compared adults who spent less than two hours a day watching television with those who spent more than four hours a day doing so.  After statistically adjusting for factors such as smoking, obesity, age, diabetes and other factors, those with greater screen time during the four year study had:

ü  A 52 percent greater risk of dying during the study.

ü  More than twice the risk of having a cardiovascular event, such as stroke, chest pain (angina), heart attack, or heart failure.

In a review of research related to sitting and cancer, each two hour a day increase in sitting time was related to:

·         An eight percent increased risk of colon cancer.

·         A ten percent increased risk of endometrial cancer.

·         A six percent increased risk of lung cancer.

These associations remained largely unchanged when study authors statistically adjusted for smoking and obesity.  However, the previously mentioned studies are preliminary and will need to be validated by future research that provides a clearer view of the risks associated with sitting.

Exercise negated:  It’s recommended that adults get at least 30 minutes of moderately intense exercise, such as brisk walking, on most days.  That’s great advice, but what about the other 14 to 18 hours you are awake during the day?  It turns out that sitting too much can largely negate many of the health benefits of moderate exercise.

One study compared adults who spent less than one hour a day with those who spent seven or more hours a day watching television.  Data from the 8.5 year study was statistically adjusted for factors such as smoking, diet quality, sex, and other factors.  People who watched the most television had a 61 percent greater risk of dying during the study than did those who watched the least.

The same data was then recalculated taking into account exercise habits.  For those who spent seven or more hours watching television daily, doing what study participants called “an hour a day of moderately intense exercise” hardly budged their increased risk of death.  It remained 61 percent greater than in those who watched the least television.  Calculated a different way, study authors estimated that one hour of continuous sitting negated the benefit of 15 minutes of moderately intense exercise.

Again, the studies mentioned above are preliminary and will need to be validated by future research, but the message is clear.  While daily exercise is important for health and maintaining independence, you also need to be mindful of your sitting habits.

Stand up for yourself:  Activities to reduce the amount of time you spend sitting, and break up stretches of continuous sitting, don’t have to be strenuous.  It’s more about habit change, such as finding ways to stand up, do light activity and walk around more often throughout the day.  You might try:

§  Getting on your feet during screen time.  Take a lap around the house during a commercial, or get up for a glass of water.  Do a chore while watching television.  Stand at your computer.  Get up and pace when you’re thinking.  Watch some shows while on a treadmill at the gym, even if you’re only walking slowly.

§  Making sitting tasks walking tasks. Walk around when you are on the phone.  Read the paper standing at the counter.  Stand while doing chores.  Meet friends for a walk and talk rather than sitting for coffee.  Wash your car by hand rather that sitting through a car wash.

§  Make things inconvenient.  Keep your television remote in a place that you have to get up and walk to reach.  Arrange an office so that you have to get up to throw things away, answer the phone, or reach the file cabinet.

Hang your laundry out on a line to dry.  Get a small wastebasket so that you have to take the trash out more often.  Park at the back of a parking lot and walk.  Get off the bus or train one stop early or one stop late and walk the rest of the way.

In addition, rather than hitting the lounge chair after a meal, get up and do something active.  About 20 to 30 minutes after a meal, blood glucose begins to spike as food is digested.  Taking a 10 to 15 minute walk at the time blood glucose starts to spike, or simply being on your feet doing something, puts your muscles into glucose absorption mode, thus flattening the blood glucose spike.

Reprinted from Mayo Clinic Health Letter with permission of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Rochester Minnesota 55905

 

STOMA MANAGEMENT

UOAA Update January 2015

 Management of a Flush or Retracted Stoma: The ideal stoma is one that protrudes above the skin, but this is not always possible and a flush (skin level) or retracted (below skin level) stoma may result. The surgeon may be unable to mobilize the bowel and mesentery (membrane that attaches organs to abdominal wall) adequately or to strip the mesentery enough without causing necrosis or death to the stoma. Some causes of stoma retraction after surgery may be weight gain, infection, malnutrition, steroids or scar tissue formation.

Stomas that are flush or retracted can lead to undermining of the pouch by effluent (drainage). This continued exposure can lead to irritated and denuded skin, as well as frequent pouch changes. These problems can be very stressful and expensive.

The inability to maintain a pouch seal for an acceptable length of time is the most common indication for a product with convexity.

Convexity Requirements:

·         Shallow - for minor skin irritations and occasional leakage

·         Medium - stoma in deep folds; severe undermining and frequent leakage

·         Deep - used when medium convexity is not sufficient, stoma is retracted or in deep folds, or leakage is very frequent and skin denuded.

Ways to Achieve Convexity:

Convex Inserts: Can be applied to a two-piece system by snapping an insert into the ring of the flange. Outer diameter must match the flange size. This can be cost effective as this insert can be cleaned and reused.

·         Pouches Designed with Convexity: These are available in both one and two-piece systems. They can be shallow, medium, or deep. They come as either precut, cut or cut to fit.

·         Addition of Skin Barrier Gaskets: These are used around the stoma and can be cut or purchased precut. You can use one layer or several layers.

·         Barrier Ring/Strip Paste: These are products that can be pressed into shape around the stoma to protect the seal.

Other Ways to Increase Wear Time and Prevent Leakage:

Ostomy Belt:  Many ostomates find this product to be helpful. The opening should clear your stoma by one-eighth inch only to give the skin maximum protection.

Ostomy Paste: Use this for "caulking" around the stoma. Always read and follow manufacturer's direction for product use.

 

 

URINE SALT CRYSTAL DEPOSITS

By Linda Sanders, CWOCN 

UOAA Update January 2015

 

Urine salt crystal buildup around urinary stomas is one of the most difficult skin care problems for people with urostomies. Urine secretes a certain amount of salt, but whether the urine is acid or alkaline determines the amount secreted. An alkaline-based urine secretes more salt than an acid-based urine; thus, more salt-crystal build-up with alkaline urine.

How can you tell if your have urine crystals? First, they can be seen as a growth, white or light brown in color, around the base of the stoma. The stoma and the area, which the growth involves, are very likely to be tender and sore. Sometimes the stoma will be completely covered by the crystals and can no longer be seen.

What are some of the underlying factors which cause urine crystals, other than alkaline urine? In many cases, two factors are usually dominant. The stoma opening in the skin barrier in all cases was too large, and these patients were wearing a pouching system designed primarily for a fecal ostomy. These two aspects may not always stand true, but in those cases I have seen, these two factors were present. Other aspects include those patients who do not use a night drainage system, thus allowing urine to remain in the pouch while they slept. This practice continually bathes the stoma with urine at night. Moreover, personal hygiene - not only on the skin area around the stoma but the cleaning and proper care of the pouching system - was performed poorly.

What to do in case of a urine-crystal buildup problem:

o   Determine the circumference of your stoma and cut your skin barrier to the correct size; i.e., not so big as to allow your Peristomal skin to show, and not so small as to more than just "brush" the stoma.

o   Change your pouching system at least twice a week. It is surprising how many people only change their skin barrier when it starts to leak. The goal is to change it before it leaks.

o   Every time you change your skin barrier, bathe your stoma with a vinegar and water solution. Use one-part vinegar to three-parts water. Bathe the stoma for several minutes with a cloth. This solution may be used between changes by inserting some of this vinegar solution in the bottom of your pouch - a syringe may be used for this - and let the solution bathe the stoma.

o   To keep control of the situation, change the alkaline urine to acid urine. The easiest and most successful way is by taking Vitamin C orally. The dosage will depend on your age, but the normal adult dosage is 250 mg four times a day. Be sure to consult your physician before taking oral medications.

o   If you follow these procedures, you should have no further concerns regarding a urine-crystal buildup. However, if you do begin to see them again, take action immediately before trouble starts.

 

 

 

 

COLOSTOMY BLOCKAGE & IT’S CAUSES

From ROSEBUD REVIEW, CVOA, Eau Claire, WI January 2015

By Dr. J. Hopkins

Dr. Hopkins states that poor bowel habits probably begin in childhood, with people being “bowel conscious”.  They erroneously think that a daily bowel movement is necessary for body and bowel functions.  He states that four requirements for normal bowel passage are:

1.       A balanced diet including some roughage.  Trying a rigid diet after a colostomy is futile and unnecessary.  By trial and error one can eliminate those foods which may cause diarrhea or constipation.  (Ed. Note:  A glass or two of grape juice can work wonders on a blockage)

2.       Exercise to maintain a good body tone.

3.       Effects of emotion.  This may be difficult to control.

4.       Adequate fluid intake.

Dr. Hopkins says that colostomy blockage may be due to mechanical defects or failures.  The most common cause of this type of stricture is a narrowing of the opening of the stoma.  Another mechanical cause is herniation around the stoma.  Blockage may also be the result of strangulation, or a sharp bend in the colon.  The mechanical problems can be corrected by your surgeon.

Other causes of blockage may be improper diet, medications and the effect of your emotions on your digestive system.  Also, for colostomates who irrigate, the position in which one irrigates (somewhat doubled over, for instance) may result in difficulty in elimination.  Dr. Hopkins recommends that his patients use the newer irrigation cones and tips for safety.

 

AN ILEOSTOMY HINT

From the PACESETTER, St. Paul, MI Ostomy Association

You should leave a little air in your pouch after you’ve emptied it.  Very often there is a tendency to flatten the pouch as much as possible so that it won’t show under your clothing.  There is always moisture in the pouch and by flattening it too much, the walls of the pouch stick together leaving no room for the discharge to drop down.  If the discharge collects around the faceplate/wafer, the pressure from your clothing will eventually cause it to leak out.  So just leave a little air and we do mean  little.  The pouch doesn’t have to have a ballooned effect, but just a soft cushion of air to keep the walls free

OCTOBER 2014

DATE: WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15, 2014

TIME: 7:00PM

PROGRAM:

REFRESHMENTS:

WHERE: KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

MEETING ROOMS A & B FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the  materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

To discontinue receiving a paper newsletter, contact Pat Walling at trainpatch@gmail.com

CHAPTER  NOTES


LONELINESS: A SURPRISING HEALTH RISK

From Rosebud Review Sept. 2014 and The Mayo Clinic Health Letter

     Mother Teresa, who devoted her life to service for the poor, referred to loneliness as “the most terrible poverty.”

     The loss of a close friend or loved one, a move to a new area, retirement—these are just a few situations that can trigger intense feelings of loneliness.  While the emotion is a common struggle, especially during certain points in life, much has been uncovered in  recent years about its profound health effects.

A lack of connection

     Are you lonely?  Odds are you might experience a feeling of isolation or disconnectedness from time to time.  In a 2010 AARP survey, 35 percent of respondents reported feeling lonely.  Close to half of the lonely group indicted that their loneliness had persisted for six years or longer.

     Experts suggest that we may experience loneliness now more than ever.  Despite advances in technology that allow us to be ever increasingly connected--think cell phones, e-mail and social media—these conveniences may take the place of face-to-face time and may inhibit the development of truly deep connections.

A greater risk than obesity

     An occasional bout of loneliness is normal, especially in the face of life changing situation, but when it persists, it can have profound effects on your body.  In fact, research has suggested that the effects of loneliness may be worse for you than carrying around extra pounds, increasing your chances of premature death by 14 percent.

     It may not be surprising that loneliness affects your mental health, often going hand in hand with depression.  The effects don’t stop there.  One recent study associates feelings of loneliness with an increased risk of developing dementia in later life.  Another shows that lonely people are subjected to fragmented sleep, a factor that’s significant due to the profound impact of quality sleep on your health.

     Feelings of isolation also may trigger changes that increase inflammation in your body.  This, in turn, may exacerbate inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and heart disease.

Loneliness lifters

     Are you simply destined to be lonely?  Of course not, if it’s something you genuinely want to change.  It may require you to step out of your comfort zone.  That applies whether you’re building up existing relationships or creating new ones.

     Friendships do require effort, but the enjoyment and comfort friendship can provide makes the investment worthwhile.  To nurture your friendships:

·         Reach out – An unexpected phone call or e-mail, even just to say hello, is a meaningful gesture.

·         Be positive – Think of friendship as an emotional bank account.  Make deposits of kindness and approval, keeping in mind that criticism and negativity draw down the account.  Non-stop complaining also puts a strain on a friendship.

·         Listen up – Ask what’s going on in your friends’ lives.  Let people know you’re paying close attention through eye contact, body language and reaffirming comments.  When friends share details of hard times they are experiencing, be empathetic.

·         Extend and accept invitations – Invite a friend to join you for coffee or lunch.  When you’re invited to a social gathering, say yes.  Contact someone who recently invited you to an activity and return the favor.

·         Respect boundaries – Don’t overtax the friendship with your own needs.  Remember that friendships require both give and take. 

At the same time it’s never too late to pick up a new friend or even a group of them.  Here are a few friend finding suggestions.

ü  Attend community events.  Get together with a group of people working toward a goal that you believe in. such as an election or the clean up of a natural area.  Find a group with similar interests in an activity, such as reading, sports, crafting or gardening.

ü  Volunteer.  Offer your time or talents at a hospital, place of worship, museum, community center, charitable group, or other organization.  You can form strong connections when you work with people who have mutual interest.

ü  Take up a new interest.  Take a college or community education course to meet people who have similar interests.  Join a class at a local gym, senior center, or community fitness facility.

ü  Join a faith community.  Take advantage of special activities or get-to-know-you events for new members.

ü  Take a walk.  Put on some good shoes and keep your eyes open.  Chat with neighbors who are also out and about, or head to a popular park and strike up conversations there.

ü  Think beyond two legs.  Whether it has four legs or even wings, a pet can provide many of the same companion benefits as human friendships can.

Loneliness  vs. being alone

     It’s important to not confuse loneliness with being alone.  You can feel lonely in a crowd, just as you can feel perfectly content by yourself.  If you know you have a solid support system waiting in the wings, you’re more likely to be able to navigate the alone times with ease or even pleasure.

     While the health benefits of friendships are considerable, time spent alone can be a valuable asset.  Use this time to be productive or to invest in yourself.  Recharge, pursue a solitary hobby, meditate, daydream or even plan how to pursue that dream in the future.


SEPTEMBER 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAM:  SHARING REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEER

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.AUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.                MEETING ROOMS A & BAUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKIWHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.                MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS

The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.CHAPTER  NOTESSEPTEMBER 2014
SEPTEMBER 2014

5 Slogans that Belong on Your Bag

fromTriangle Area Ostomy Association:

The By Pass Newsletter, June 2012

1.Does this cover make my stoma look fat?

2.Finally! A bag that matches my shoes!

3.Sh*t happens!

4.Secret weapon on board

5.I’ll show you mine if you show me yours!

 

 

 

Continuing your Social Life

with an Ostomy

via UOAA UPDATE, June 2014

Your social life can be as active as it was before surgery. You can enjoy all activities: meeting people, attending concerts, sporting events, civic and social club meetings, parties, religious occasions or whatever you enjoyed

before. The first time you go out of the house after surgery, you may feel as if everyone is staring at your pouch, even though it is not visible under your clothing.

You can feel your pouch on your body, but no one can see it. Keep these

questions in mind:  

1.    Did you know what an ostomy was or where a stoma was located or what it looked like before you had surgery?

2.    You may also worry about your pouch filling with gas and sticking out under your clothing. A quick trip to the restroom can take care of this problem. If you are worried about your pouch filling up immediately after eating at a social event, remember, people without ostomies often need to go to the restroom after eating and nobody will think it is unusual if you do the same! You will probably find that you need to empty your pouch less often than you need to urinate.

Friendship and love:

You may be wondering about your relationship with others. Now that you have an ostomy, you may feel that it will change your present relationships and decrease new opportunities for friendship and love.

True friendships and deep relationships on any level are built on trust and mutual understanding. These qualities depend on you and other persons. You have the same qualities you had before surgery and your ability to develop friendships is unchanged. If you care about yourself, others will feel your strength and will not be deterred. If your ostomy does cause a break in a friendship or a relationship or even marriage, this relationship was not built upon trust and mutual respect and probably would have crumbled sometime in the future anyway.



SEPTEMBER 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, SEPT 17,2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAMSHARING
REFRESHMENTS:  NEED A VOLUNTEER

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.
AUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED
REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKI
WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.
               MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.
               MEETING ROOMS A & B
AUGUST 2014DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014TIME:  7:00 PMPROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED
REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKI
WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.
               MEETING ROOMS A & B               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS. The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.
               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

CHAPTER  NOTES

 

The meeting for August was attending by some new visitors.  Leilani, a colostomate for 4 years and Pat, who is a new ileostomate. We welcome you and hope we will have the pleasure of seeing you at many more of our support meetings in the future.

Congratulations to Richard Cahill.  He won the door prize this month.  Richard is a long standing member and this is his first visit in almost 10 years.  We were happy to see you and hope you won’t wait so long before coming back.

Unfortunately, our speaker was not able to attend this month so there was a lot of sharing going on and Rochelle Stacey, our President, informed us that she, and husband Jim Stacey, delivered 13 HUGE boxes to VIDA in August.  Way to go everyone that contributed.  She also said she received 7 calls for product donations, had 2 telephone visits and did 1 visitation.  She has been a busy president. 

At the meeting we were told that the TSA website has new mobility document for us to review and print.  It is for the world traveler or just someone who would need it occasionally.  Check it out.

In September we will be voting for the UOAA candidates, so please go to the UOAA website and check them out before you cast your ballot at the meeting.  Rochelle says she is available to help you review if you want to contact her.

Mark you calendar for October 24.  This meeting is going to be special.  There will be a Coloplast representative speaking and bringing in lots of new products (AND SAMPLES).  Plan to attend to see what if happening in the Ostomy World.

Our plans to have some of our meetings in Fairfield have been pushed forward to 2015.  We will keep you informed as we have more news.

Excerpt from WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE PEANUT BUTTER GANG

By H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

 

If there is anything we wish to change in the child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could better be changed in ourselves.  (Carl Jung)

 

THE FLU AND WHAT TO DO

UOAA Update 7/13 and Contra Costomy News September 2014

 

The flu brings with it headaches, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches and pains!!!!  The advice:  plenty of fluids and rest in bed.  This remains sound medical advice for your general attack of the virus.  If your case of the flu includes that “bug-a-boo” diarrhea, you may find the following hints helpful. 

For those with a colostomy, it is usually wise not to irrigate during this time.  Your intestine is really washing itself out.  After diarrhea, you have a sluggish colon for a few days, so again, “leave it alone”.  Start irrigation again after a few days when your colon has had a chance to return to normal. 

For the ileostomate, diarrhea is a greater hazard.  Along with the excess water discharge, there is a loss of electrolytes and vitamins that are necessary in maintaining good health.  This loss is usually referred to as a loss of fluid which, in turn, brings a state of dehydration.  Therefore, you must restore electrolyte balance.  First eliminate all solid food.  Second, obtain potassium safely and effectively from tea, bullion and ginger ale.  Third, obtain sodium from saltine crackers or salted pretzels.  Cranberry and orange juices also contain potassium, while bullion and tomato juice are good sources of sodium.  Fourth, drink a lot of water.

Vomiting also brings the threat of dehydration.  If it is severe and continuing, your doctor should be notified or go to the ER. 

You should also know that diarrhea may be symptomatic of partial obstruction or an acute attack of gastroenteritis.  Since the treatment of these two entities is entirely different, a proper diagnosis should be made as rapidly as possible if obstruction is suspected because of localized cramping.  A physician should be sought immediately.

You can see why it is important to determine whether the diarrhea is caused (1) by obstruction or (2) by gastroenteritis.  If you do not know, check it out with your doctor.  Do not play games.  Remember, always call your physician unless you 100% certain of what you are doing.

For urostomates, be sure to keep electrolytes in balance by following the general instructions for colostomates and ileostomates.  No ostomate should take medicine for pain or a laxative without a physician’s order.  Do not use antibiotics for colds or flu unless the doctor orders it.  In colostomy patients, drugs or certain foods can cause constipation.  The can be prevented during a cold by drinking plenty of liquids.  Increased water intake in the ileostomate results in increased urine output rather than increased water discharge through the appliance.

When returning to solid foods, use fiber-free foods at first,  gradually increasing to a regular, normal diet.

 

HYDRATION IS A HABIT

Your whole body will appreciate

From the Pouch September 2014 and Secure Start Newsletter

 

Whether you have a urostomy or not, fluids are important to the well being of your body.  It is essential because the body is comprised mostly of water and the proper balance between water and electrolytes in our bodies really determines how most of our systems function, including nerves and muscles.  Drinking fluids serves a range of purposes, such as removing waste through urine, controlling body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure and of course maintaining a healthy metabolism.

If you have a urostomy, it’s even more important to make sure you keep hydrated to keep your kidneys functioning properly and to help prevent urinary tract infections.  Of course, each person’s needs are unique and it’s best to consult your medical prersonnel for advice on how much fluid to drink.

 

“DRINKING” TIPS

From The Pouch September 2014

 

·         Drinking plenty of water each day is the best way to prevent urinary tract infections.

·         Eat a balanced diet.

·         Eating beets will turn your urine a reddish color—this is temporary and is  no cause for alarm.

·         Asparagus and seafood may cause urine odor.

·         Alcohol is a huge dehydrator.  You should try to limit your intake, but if you are going to raise a glass, aim for at least a one-to-one ratio with water.

·         If you don’t like the taste of plain water, try adding lemor or lime.

·         If you’re going to exercise, make sure you drink water before, during and after your workout.

·         If you have trouble remembering to drink water, drink on a schedule and place the schedule in different places as it will help you remember.

 

 

While we are on the subject of drinking water here is a blast from the past that always bears repeating.  From the UOAA update of 6/2014

 

WHAT TO DRINK WITH DRUGS

           

            How many times have your received a prescription with the instructions to “take as needed” or “take before meals”?  Pretty vague, but many people do not stop to question further, assuming the medication will work, no matter what they swallow it with.

            Acidic drinks, such as fruit juice or soda pop, may chemically destroy certain kinds of antibiotics, including penicillin, ampicillin, or erythromycin.  Citrus fruit juices may reduce the effect of antidepressants, antihistamines or major tranquilizers by speeding their urinary secretion.

            Milk can interfere with a number of medicines.  The laxative Ducolax, for example, has a coating designed to ensure that the drug will dissolve slowly within the intestine.  If the medication is taken with milk, which is alkaline, it may dissolve prematurely within the stomach, lose it cathartic action and irritate the sensitive stomach lining.  Milk can also block the action tetracycline.  If a doctor fails to warn his patient not to take this antibiotic within an hour of any dairy product, he or she might be puzzled to hear the infection being treated has not disappeared.

            Even something as simple as tea, hot or cold, may cause problems.  A woman given a mineral supplement to treat iron deficiency anemia would probably be surprised to learn that the tannin in tea can undo the benefits of her iron pills.

            To play it safe, you can always rely on GOOD OLD WATER!! Water will not interact with drugs or reduce their effectiveness.




AUGUST 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAM: NICK GRITZAI JR., MARKETING MANAGER FOR CYMED
REFRESHMENTS:  BRENDA GORZINSKI

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

               MEETING ROOMS A & B

               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS.


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.


CHAPTER NOTES

DOORS WILL LOCK AT 7:00pm

Due to the pharmacy now closing at 6:30pm, the doors will be locked at 7:00pm.  If you arrive after that time, go to the left to the next set of entry doors and take a right at the first door, then another right at the next door.  This will take you to the hallway near where you usually enter.  Proceed to the meeting room from there.

 

Excerpt from WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE PEANUT BUTTER GANG

By H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Smiles are wondrous things.  You can give them out for eternity and always have one left over for yourself.         –Colleen, age 13.

 

  

Learning Experiences About Skin Cancer

By Co-President Ben Byer, Knoxville, TN

2/2014 UOAA Update

On June 1, I was diagnosed with a basal cell skin cancer on my nose that required some memorable surgical procedures. I can say that had I known what this treatment was going to be like, I would have taken much better care of my skin. However, here are some facts about skin cancer that you might like to know:

My doctors (3 of them in the group) tell me that they see about 30 new cases of skin cancer every week. About all of these are on adults and more are on older adults than on younger ones. These cancers are caused by cumulative exposure to the sun over the years that damaged the skin. Even sunburns from 20-30 years ago may eventually show up as skin cancer. Most of the cancers occur on the head (nose, cheeks, ears, and brows) while substantial numbers occur on the tops of the shoulders. There are many treatment regimens for these conditions: simple freezing with a spray, chemical processes, laser techniques, and several forms of surgery.

There are definite signs of these cancers and if you have any of them you should see a dermatologist ASAP!!!! They are:

Any skin sore that does not seem to heal as you normally expect.

Any change in the color, shape, size, or sensitivity of moles, warts, or blemishes. Itching is also a sure sign of a problem with a mole.

 

It is difficult to keep head and shoulders covered from the sun all the time or to keep sun block lotions on all the time, so here are a few practical suggestions that might work to protect you from a visit to the dermatologist:

Try to stay out of the sun from 10 AM-3 PM on bright sunny days or at least take special precautions to cover up. The sun's rays are much more intense during these hours than in early morning or late afternoon. Most people can adjust their schedules accordingly.

Get used to wearing a hat. Bald or balding areas are especially susceptible to getting skin cancer on the tops and sides of the head. Baseball caps do not protect ears.

Barbers and beauticians might notice a situation on your head and neck that you do not realize is there. Examine these situations closely.

 

Melanoma will strike 53,000 Americans this year and kill about 7,400 more than any other form of skin cancer. New scientist report in the British Science Journal Nature that they have identified a gene that when damaged contributes to melanoma. The researchers hope their discovery will lead to a development of drugs that can target the mutated gene and stop cancer cells from proliferating.

 

 

 

 

Summertime…and the Living is Easy

by Bobbie Brewer, Greater Atlanta Ostomy Association, July 2011 and North Central OK Ostomy Outlook

Summertime fun may include many outdoor activities and travel, but may also lead to some concerns about ostomy management. Let’s review:

Swimming is an excellent exercise and activity you can enjoy with family and friends. So, why are so many of us afraid to get back into the water? Check out these tips:

  • Don’t go swimming immediately after you have put on a new pouching system.
  • Make sure your pouch is empty and has a secure seal.
  • Picture framing your wafer with water-proof tape isn’t necessary, but may give you the extra confidence you need.
  • Take precautions against sunburn. Besides being bad for your skin; a bad sunburn can result in diarrhea and sometimes vomiting, thus depleting electrolytes.
  • When sitting and soaking up the sun, protect/shade your pouching system by placing some covering across the outside area (e.g., hat, towel, magazine).
  • Monilia is a common summer problem. This raised, itchy, red rash on the peristomal skin is uncomfortable and keeps the pouches from holding well. If you suspect a monilia rash, consult an ostomy nurse.

Fluids and More Fluids are needed during the hot summer months. Review the following:

  • Water is an essential nutrient needed by each and every body cell. Up to 75% of the body’s mass is made up of water. Water controls body temperature, serves as building material and solvent, and transports nutrients. Thirst is a signal that the body needs fluids. Daily losses must be replaced. Encourage fluid intake of eight to ten (8 oz) glasses of liquids each day.
  • Any liquid containing water (soda, milk, juice, etc.) helps to meet your daily requirement. You can also get water from the food you eat (e.g., tomatoes have a total of 94% water content). [North Central OK Ed. note: And don’t worry if liquids contain some caffeine. It’s a myth that caffeinated drinks are dehydrating.]
  • Water is an excellent natural beverage; however, over-consumption of water can wash away electrolytes in the body. Drink a combination of water and electrolyte beverages. The glucose ingredient in electrolyte drinks aids in the absorption of electrolytes. [North Central OK Ed. note: To emphasize this point, runners in marathon races have collapsed, and sometimes even died, due to hyponatremia—low blood sodium caused by drinking too much plain water.]

Summer Diets

  • Remember the fiber content of those fresh fruits and vegetables—enjoy but chew, chew [ileostomates, especially].
  • Add only one new food at a time to determine the effect (if any) on your output.

Tips for Traveling with Medications and/or Ostomy Supplies

  • Keep your medicines (and emergency pouches) with you—not in the checked luggage.
  • Bring more than enough medicine and/or ostomy supplies for your trip.
  • Keep a list of all your medicines and/or ostomy supplies with you.
  • Do not store ostomy supplies in your car, especially under the hot summer sun.


JUNE/JULY 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18,2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAM:  SHARING
REFRESHMENTS:  AL & BRENDA GORZINSKI

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

               MEETING ROOMS A & B

               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS.


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.


CHAPTER NOTES

DOORS WILL LOCK AT 7:00pm

Due to the pharmacy now closing at 6:30pm, the doors will be locked at 7:00pm.  If you arrive after that time go to the left to the next set of entry doors and take a right at the first door, then another right at the next door.  That will take you to the hallway near where you usually enter.  Proceed to the meeting room from there.

 

Last month’s birthday potluck was another smashing success.  There was so much food brought by the people that attended that everyone had plenty to take home.   If you were not able to be there, you missed a great time of sharing and caring, not to mention DESSERT!

 

Rick Siefke M.S.W., from Sutter-Solano Medical Center, sent a very nice letter thanking us for the many years we have included him on our mailing list.  It is nice to know that the newsletter is being of help to so many people.  The editor really appreciates the feedback, as I know the other editors do too.

 

The sponsorship of one camper was approved for camp this summer along with an additional $60.00 for travel expenses thanks to a generous contribution by a C.W.O.C.N.

 

UOAA announced that they are re-designing the national website and it should go live sometime in June.

 

Rochelle Stacey and Dave Randolph are working on getting a date set in September for a meeting in Fairfield.  We will keep you informed as we get further details.


The CYMED Rep will be presenting products and giving us useful information at our August meeting.  Mark your calendars for August 20 and plan to attend.


COLOSTOMY HINTS

UOAA UPDATE: Feb 2013 via Contra Costomy News & Rosebud Monthly, Chico CA 3/10

 

Diet:  There is no such thing as a colostomy diet.  A colostomy is not an illness,so  try to eat the same foods you have eaten and enjoyed in the past.  If you are on a diet for a condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure, of course you should stay on this diet.

Foods can be acidic or alkaline, bland or spicy, laxative like or constipating.  Individuals react differently to food.  Try to return to your formal normal diet.  Those foods that disagreed with you in the past may still do so.  Chew well and see the effect of each food on your colostomy output.

To maintain good health, the body requires carbohydrates, proteins, fat, minerals and vitamins.  Water is not nutritious, but is absolutely necessary.  Having a balanced diet is a fitting way for people to maintain good nutrition and keep bowel activity normal.  Every day your body needs meats or fish, dairy foods, vegetables and fruits, cereals and bread as well as liquids. 

If you wear a pouch all the time you will suffer no embarrassment if something you eat produces an unexpected discharge.  You will soon learn which foods produce gas or odor, which  cause diarrhea and which are constipating.  With this knowledge, you can regulate the bowel’s behavior to a certain extent.

You cannot prevent intestinal activity by not eating.  An empty intestine produces gas.  No matter what your plans might be, eat regularly, several times a day, with perhaps a small meal before going to bed at night.  Your colostomy will function better for it.

Daily life:   Once you have recovered your health, you may continue a normal day’s routine, just as you did before surgery.  A colostomy is not an impediment to most activity.  When its care has been properly determined, it will not interfere with your daily schedule.

Work:  Colostomates can do most jobs.  However, lifting can cause the stoma to herniate or prolapse, especially soon after surgery.  A sudden blow in the appliance area could  cause the faceplate to shift and cut the stoma.  Still there are some colostomates who do heavy lifting, such as firefighters, mechanics and truck drivers.  Check with your doctor about your type of work. 

As with all surgery, it will take time for you to regain your strength after the operation.  A letter from your doctor to your employer may be helpful should your employer have doubts about what you can do.

Sometimes colostomates find that their employers think that the colostomy will keep them from doing their jobs.  This also happens to some colostomates who are applying for new jobs.  You should know your right to work is protected by parts of the US Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.  As well as by sections of your state laws.  If you feel you are being unfairly treated because of your colostomy, call the UOAA office at 800.826.0826.

 

10 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR OR PHARMACIST ABOUT A NEW PRESCRIPTION

From UOAA UPDATE 2/14 & Contra Costomy News 6/14

 

Prescription drugs are life savers, but only if they’re used correctly.  In the U.S. nearly half of all medications are not taken as directed.  Fourteen percent of prescriptions never get filled, thirteen percent are filled but never used and twenty nine percent are filled but not finished.

 

      1.      What’s the name of the drug you are prescribing?

      2.      Is a less expensive generic version of this drug available?

      3.      How much will I be taking and how many times a day?

      4.      What time of day is best to take the medication and should be taken with food or without.

      5.      Does the medication require refrigeration?

      6.      What side effects, if any, might I experience and what should I do if they occur?

      7.      Is it safe to take this drug with other drugs or supplements, or with alcohol?

      8.      What do I do if I miss a dose?

      9.      How long will I be taking the drug?

     10.      Do I need to finish the entire dosage you’re prescribing even if I feel better before that?

 

SIX (ONLY 6) COMMANDMENTS FOR THE NEW (or not so new) OSTOMATE

From the Contra Costomy News 6/14

 

        1. Thou shalt not be afraid of having or showing emotions.  They are what make you human.  Sadness, anger and depression are allowed.  Whoever said you must have a happy face every moment.

       2. That being said, thou shalt not let emotions rule your life, for the rest of your life.


     3. Thou shalt continue to accept, learn about and care for your ostomy.  You are a survivor.  When you need help, ask for it.  If a product is not working for you, find an alternative.  Help is out there.  Seek it.

         4. Thou shalt look for the humor in your new situation, being diligent to stay ‘real’ (see #1).  Everybody’s body has occasional glitches in function.  Notice it, grin (or grimace) and move on.

    5. Thou shalt look for ways to help others, especially ostomates, but non-ostomates too.  Attend a support group, volunteer your time, tell your story.  Focus on something other than yourself as often as you can.

    6.  Thou shalt celebrate every day of your life and so honor God who gave you life.





MAY 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, MAY 21,2014
TIME:  ARRIVE 6:30PM, EAT AT 7:00 PM
PROGRAM:  BIRTHDAY PARTY
REFRESHMENTS:  CHICKEN, DRINKS & DESSERT PROVIDED BY OAS.  BRING YOUR FAVORITE SIDE DISH.

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

               MEETING ROOMS A & B

               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS.


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

CHAPTER NOTES

DOORS WILL LOCK AT 7:00pm

Due to the pharmacy now closing at 6:30pm, the doors we normally use will be locked at 7:00pm.  If you arrive after that time go to the left to the next set of entry doors and take a right at the first door, then another right at the next door.  That will take you to the hallway near where you usually enter.  Proceed to the meeting room from there.

 

At April’s meeting, a Certificate of Recognition was presented to Julie Walton for all of the work she does for her patients as well as the work she puts in for the OAS.  We are so proud of Julie and feel privileged to have her as a part of our association. 

Unfortunately the CYMED rep was not able to make it to this month’s meeting.  Rochelle found out that at the time Nick was supposed to be speaking he was in surgery because of a severe broken arm.  We all wish you a speedy recovery Nick and hope to see you soon.

It was decided that we would vote at the May meeting regarding the child for Youth Camp this year.

Lori Durbin sent a nice letter telling us that she is back where she started at John Muir Health and is doing very well.  We are all so pleased to hear from her and want to thank you Lori for the materials you sent along.

Rochelle reported that this year 9 boxes of supplies went to VIDA and when she returned home from making the delivery, 2 large 30 gallon bags of supplies were waiting on her doorstep.  Looks like next year will be even better than this one.

Plans are still moving forward for a Fairfield meeting place.  More details will follow in the months ahead.  Stay tuned…

Kats Yamamoto won the Stoma Pool and Donna Osario won the door prize.  Way to go folks.


ODE TO THE ET (WOCN) NURSE

by Janice Petrocchi (from The Pacesetter, newsletter of the St. Paul, MN Ostomy Assoc.) & Rosebud Review CVOA Eau Clair, WI

Your ET nurse is your best friend,
                       She treats you right from end to end.
Always the teacher, forever the nurse,
                     She helps you get better, never worse!
If bowel or bladder, her care’s the same,
                          Your stoma’s welfare tops her aim.

To have it flow when it should flow

                          And keep it’s healthy rosebud glow.
She gets you right back on your feet,
                      She goads, cajoles you, always sweet.

While all the while she teaches you

                         That life’s worthwhile to start anew.

“The stoma means a new beginning”

                She tells you, “Now’s the time for winning

And rush to the join the joyous throng

                            That celebrates life’s happy song”.

“Visit” she says, “go tell your story

                 Please keep it simple and save the glory”.

To help patients gather hope

                     And find new ways to help them cope.

But goes your stoma on the blink,

                           The nurse is there, quick as a wink.

To poke it, soak it, daub it with goo

           And when she’s done, your stoma’s like new.

To sum it up, a friend indeed,

                                  A shining light in time of need.

The ET nurse takes care of you,

                 As only your very own mother would do.

 

Medicare Patients:Watch Out for "Under Observation" Status

Compiled from Internet sources - OK Ostomy Outlook

UOAA UPDATE April 2014

 

If you're under Medicare and get hospitalized, be aware whether you've been classified as an "inpatient" or are just "under observation." The distinction may seem subtle, as you may receive the same care both ways. However, the difference may cost you thousands of dollars.

The difference in cost may occur two ways: First, if you're only under observation, you may need to pay somewhat more for the hospital care itself. When you're an inpatient, the costs are covered by Medicare A, which usually pays the full cost after a deductible is met. If you're only under observation, the costs are covered by Medicare B, which pays only 80% of the cost. The really big consequences occur if you require care in a skilled nursing facility after your hospital stay. Medicare pays for the nursing costs only if you were in the hospital as an inpatient for at least 3 days. If you were only under observation, Medicare pays nothing for the nursing care, so you must pay that whole cost yourself.

Hospitals have been using under observation status increasingly in recent years, due to pressure from Medicare to reduce costs to Medicare by reducing improper inpatient admissions.

What can you do as a patient? First, make sure you know whether you're an inpatient or just under observation (the hospital may not always tell you). If you're only under observation, but think you should be an inpatient, ask your regular doctor to speak with the doctor in charge of your hospital care, and try to get your status changed. If that doesn't work, you can appeal Medicare denial of payment decisions. This can be a long and difficult process, but has a reasonable chance of success if you go through with it

    Relaxation Exercise

Adapted from Cancer.gov website sponsored by the National Cancer Institute

UOAA UPDATE April 2014

 

 Practicing deep relaxation exercises may help relieve pain or reduce stress. This exercise may not be right for everyone. Ask your doctor or nurse if this exercise can help you. Practice slowly at first so you can get used to deep breathing and muscle relaxation. Find a quiet place where you can rest undisturbed for 20 minutes. Let others know you need this time for yourself. Make sure the setting is relaxing. For example, dim the lights if you like, and find a comfortable chair or couch.

Get into a comfortable position where you can relax your muscles. Close your eyes and clear your mind of distractions.

Breathe deeply, at a slow and relaxing pace. People usually breathe shallowly, high in their chests. Concentrate on breathing deeply and slowly, raising your belly, rather than just your chest, with each breath.

Next, go through each of your major muscle groups, tensing (squeezing) them for 10 seconds and then relaxing. If tensing any particular muscle group is painful, skip the tensing step and concentrate just on relaxing. Focus completely on releasing all the tension from your muscles and notice the differences you feel when they are relaxed. Focus on the pleasant feeling of relaxation.  You may find that your mind wanders. When you notice yourself thinking of something else, gently direct your attention back to your deepening relaxation. Be sure to maintain your deep breathing.

Review the parts of your body again, and release any tension that remains. Be sure to maintain your deep breathing.

Now that you are relaxed, imagine a calming scene. Choose a spot that is particularly pleasant to you. It may be a favorite comfortable room, a sandy beach, a chair in front of a fireplace or any other relaxing place. Concentrate on the details. What can you see/ hear/ smell/ feel around you? Continue to breathe deeply, as you imagine yourself relaxing in your safe, comfortable place.

When you are ready, start gently moving your hands and feet and bringing yourself back to reality. Open your eyes, and spend a few minutes becoming more alert. Notice how you feel now that you have completed the relaxation exercise, and try to carry these feelings with you into the rest of your day.









APRIL 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, APRIL  16,2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAM: 
REFRESHMENTS: 

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

               MEETING ROOMS A & B

               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS.


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

Ostomy—The New Normal:  Recognition Of The Spouse

adapted from an article in News and Views, Pomona Valley Ostomy Association, Upland, CA &

The Rosebud Review, Chippewa Valley Ostomy Assoication, Eau Claire, WI

 

There are few times when genuine recognition is given to the spouse of a person with an ostomy.  The souse deserves more credit than anyone could possibly bestow on him or her.  Try for a moment to imagine that the shoe in on the foot.  That is, your spouse has the ostomy and you don’t. 

Now, you find yourself waiting to use the bathroom, waiting for your mate to get through irrigating or replacing the pouching system.   When you go out of town or make a visit and your spouse has an “accident”, you have to cut your outing short and go home so the ostomate can clean up.  We should point out that most of these challenges happen so rarely and with such minor intensity that they hardly need to be mentioned.

The quality of life for ostamates is being studied vigorously right now.  The results of every study demonstrate nthat the quality of life after ostomy surgery is remarkably better than before the surgery for people who inflammatory bowel disease.

Nevertheless, the spouse of an ostomateshould be given a great big orchid (maybe the whole plant) and we should all be thankful that we have a person like our spouse.  That goes for thanking our families as well.  Even though we have a new opportunity for life given to us  by our surgery, there’s a natural period of mourning after the loss of an important organ.  Our spouse and family can be the most supportive while we mourn our loss.

For most of us, our spouse is very happy to have us alive.  Ostomy surgery gave us a new life and our life partners can be thankful to have us still with them.  For those of us who had Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, our lives are better than ever.  Our mates may once again have us all  themselves, without sharing us with a disease.  It’s nice being healthy.  It’s nice being a spouse.

 

Self-Acceptance:  A Must For Restoring Intimacy

From UOAA Update & Rosebud Review, Chippewa Valley Ostomy Association, Eau Claire, WI

 

Frequently, among the first things to enter a recovering patient’s mind after major surgery is, “will I be a whole person in the eyes of my spouse?”

Accepting one’s self is the first step toward a happier marriage and sex life (at any time, for that matter!)  By accepting one’s self, one appears as an emotionally well balanced and relaxed person, appealing to his or her spouse.   When one has fear of rejection, fear of being unable to perform, fear of not being loved, these fears can be self-fulfilling prophecies.

A mutual healthy, emotional caring for and about each other’s well-being always plays the most important role in a loving relationship.  Another most important ingredient is openness.  A comfortable attitude that accompanies self-acceptance and invites acceptance by the other.

If you are concerned about houw your spouse will react to the change in your body, that is normal.  The hardest part is accepting what you cannot change, but you must accept for a healthy outlook.  Once you manage to banish fear of rejection and the anger of “WHY ME?” you can work w=toward rebuilding emotional health and toward becoming comfortable with your new image.

Your spouse may have greater emotional hang-ups than you do.  Concerns thay may be magnified by concerns for your emotional health.  Your own positive attitude goes far in rebuilding the relationship, rekindling the “old spark”.

 

HELPFUL HINTS FOR UROSTOMATES

From News and Views, Pomona Valley Ostomy Association, Upland, CA, UOAA  Update and the Rosebud Review, Chippewa Valley Ostomy Association, Eau Claire, WI

 

The urinary pouch should be emptied often.  Empty the pouch before it passes the half-full level.  If the puch becomes too full, there is a chance of a urine backup, risking kidney infection.  Also, there is a greater chance for a “spill”.  There is no odor when the pouch is kept clean.

When you hook up at night, leave enough urine in the pouch to fill the entire night-drain tube, eliminating air bubbles which prevent an even flow and can cause backupproblems.

For best results, you will want to change your appliance first thing in the morning, before you eat or drink anything.  This may give you some breathing room for a few minutes (when your stoma will not be active) to get the skin dried off and the new appliance in place.  If you ben over and try to be sure all stored liquid is forced out before you begin the change, it may also give you a few minutes of inactivity to complete the change.

 

Hydration: Pale Yellow is a Good color

Cheryl Weiner, RN, BSN, CWON Inpatient Wound/Ostomy Education CMC-Mercy

 

Your body is made up of 40-70% water; envision a water bottle 60% full and this is pretty much equivalent to what your body is in relation to its water content.

Optimal hydration helps your body function more effectively and efficiently. If you are adequately hydrated your blood flows easier, your concentration and ability to deal with details is enhanced, your joints and eyes are better lubricated, your body temperature is better regulated, your skin is more flexible and toned, you are able to lose weight easier and your sleep patterns are normalized. Being optimally hydrated also has been linked to a decrease in colon cancer and chronic diseases such as kidney disease and diabetes. 

So what happens when your body doesn’t get enough fluid to function properly? Envision a water bottle that is only 30-40% full. You can have specific immediate symptoms such as: headaches, irritability, fatigue, dry mouth, dizziness and muscle weakness.

But what happens when you are chronically dehydrated? Now envision a water bottle only 20% full. Ouch!

You put yourself at risk for high blood pressure and a fast heart rate leading to heart disease and decreased kidney function, your feel lethargic and your sleep is not restorative, and you are at a higher risk for blood clots and strokes.

So how much fluid do you need to ingest to stay adequately hydrated? That is a very good question that science does not have a hard answer for. The old adage that everyone should drink 8 eight ounces of fluid a day is not scientifically proven. There is no definitive answer of “X” amount of fluids/day but rather a more common sense approach that is individualized to the person, age, activity, environment and health status.

Even with all these aforementioned adjectives, it all boils down to: consume enough fluids so that you are urinating every 2-4 hours and your urine is a pale yellow color.

Now that we know how much fluid we need to ingest, where can you get the fluids needed to keep your urine a pale yellow color? Most people would be surprised to learn that all foods (except dehydrated foods) can be counted towards the daily intake of needed fluids. Obviously, soups, fruits and vegetables have the highest percentage of water per volume (80%) with a decreasing percentage of volume of water as you move from meats (40-50%) to breads (<40%) to sugary snacks (<10%). All liquid fluids have water and can be counted as

hydrating mediums including milk, coffee, tea, soda and juices. The one beverage that is not hydrating is alcohol. Alcohol has been shown to increase the excretion of water from the body.

So, for optimal health, drink and consume foods high in moisture so that you are urinating every 2-4 hours and your urine is a pale yellow color.








MARCH 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19, 2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAM:  SHARING
REFRESHMENTS:  JULIE WALTON

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

               MEETING ROOMS A & B

               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS.


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

CHAPTER NOTES

 

This month was a sharing meeting and everyone had to agree that in January the representative from Hollister was very informative as usual and expressed deep regret to hear that Shelley will be retiring and we will be getting a new representative.  They all wish her well in her retirement and look forward to the next Hollister rep, whoever that person may be.  You will have big shoes to fill.

Rochelle Stacey had her knee surgery and was not able to attend this meeting but we heard that the surgery went well and she is, in pain but, doing well.  She was missed as was Jim Stacey.

We had a new guest who was pre-surgery at the meeting and, as of this writing, has just had her urostomy surgery.  She was so happy to be able to meet other urostomates and get some information about what she can expect before her surgery. 

This is the reason we are here.  To help each other as we go along the path of being an ostomate.  From the very beginning everyone can use some support.  If you feel you don’t need the support, can you help support someone else? 

We welcome Liz and want to invite you back to become a member of the OSA for giving and sharing support with each other.

The American Cancer Society is in a new facility in Suisun where we are now printing our newsletter.  We are so grateful to Napa for stepping in and helping us out when we lost the old facility.  They really filled the gap.

The new facility makes getting your newsletter out to you easier for this editor.  I also want to thank Rose Taylor and Donna Osario for still coming to my aid and helping with folding and labeling. Between the four of us it goes very fast and smoothly and besides we get to visit.

Julie Walton announced that the renewal letters for dues are going out on 2/20/14 and she is hoping to get back all renewals in March.

After the meeting this month it was time for dessert and Donna brought her yummy crème puffs with Rose bringing a decadent cherry cheesecake.  Okay Julie, you are going to have a challenge to come up with a topper for the refreshments in March.

See you all there! 



Urostomy Care

UOAA Update 7/13

 

The urostomate should keep in mind that the stoma may shrink for several months following surgery. It is important that your appliance fits well so that the skin around the stoma does not become thick and white due to contact with urine. This crust may rub against the stoma, causing bleeding. To cleanse the pouch of crystals, soak it in a solution of 1 part vinegar to 2 parts water. Several glasses of cranberry juice each day will help restore the acid level in your body and there is less crystallization.

The urinary pouch should be emptied often. There is no odor when the pouch is kept clean. The portion of the intestine (the ileum) that is used to form the “conduit” is mucous forming, so it is not unusual or abnormal to see some mucous in the urine. Before attaching the night drain, leave sufficient urine in the pouch to fill the entire length of the tube. This eliminates air bubbles which prevent the flow through the tube and causes backup problems.

Please remember that for best results, you will want to change your appliance first thing in the morning before you eat or drink anything. This may give some breathing room for a few minutes (when your stoma will not be active) to get the skin dried off and the new appliance in place. If you bend over and try to be sure all stored liquid is forced out before you begin the change, it may also help give you a few minutes of inactivity to complete the change.

 

 

Ostomy Terms and Procedures

Learning the Lingo

UOAA UPDATE 7/13

If you are reading this newsletter, chances are you or someone close to you has had an intestinal orurinary diversion. This is the broadest terminology for the types of surgeries we are all dealing with at various stages whether just starting out or successfully managing for a number of years. Quite simply, our body’s waste management system has been diverted or changed from its normal course. If you have an intestinal diversion, the way your body excretes (or passes) solid waste has been changed. If you have a urinary diversion, the normal flow of urine from the kidneys to the bladder has been interrupted. These two types of diversions can be further divided into two more subdivisions: continent and incontinent diversions.

 Continent Diversion—a continent diversion is one where the elimination of solid waste or urine is controlled. The control is made possible through the creation of an internal reservoir (a man-made pouch inside your body) to hold the feces or urine. Elimination is then done through manually inserting tubing to drain the reservoir (catheterization). In the case of “pull-throughs” where the reservoir has been attached to the anus, elimination is through normal means.

You may have a Kock (or K) pouch; an Indiana pouch; a Barnett Continent Ileal Reservoir; or a pullthrough such as J, S, or W pouch; an ileoanal (or pelvic) reservoir; or similar procedure. These are allconsidered continent (controlled) diversions.

Incontinent Diversion—the elimination of either fecal waste or urine is not controlled in this type of diversion and requires the patient to wear a pouching system. Usually an ostomy is considered to be an incontinent procedure.

 Ostomy—an ostomy refers to a surgically created opening in the body for the discharge of body wastes and allows for the formation of a stoma.

 Stoma—the actual end of the small intestine (ileum) or large intestine (colon) that can be seen protruding through the abdominal wall and through which the feces or urine is discharged. The ideal stoma is round, dark pink and moist. The skin around the stoma (the peristomal skin) is intact with no breaks or cuts and no irritation. Not every stoma is ideal, though. Your own stoma may be retracted, flush or prolapsed and may require additional attention to manage properly.

 Retracted Stoma—your intestine is pulling in and creating a concave effect, so that your stoma is below the surface of your skin. This may result in increased skin irritation.

 Flush Stoma—the stoma is at the same height, or flush, with the surface of the skin. This also may result in increased skin irritation.

 Prolapsed Stoma—the intestine is being pulled out of the abdominal opening, so that the stoma sticks out further than desirable. This can be uncomfortable and may cause the stoma to not work as efficiently.

There are basically three types of ostomies that result in the formation of a stoma: colostomy, ileostomy and urostomy.

 Colostomy—A colostomy is created when a portion of the colon (large intestine) or the rectum (the portion just above the anal opening) is surgically removed and the remaining colon is brought to the abdominal wall. It may further be defined by the portion of the colon involved and/or its permanence.

Sigmoid or Descending Colostomy—the most common type of ostomy surgery, in which the end of the descending or sigmoid colon (the portion that goes down the left side of your body) is brought to the surface of the abdomen. It is usually located on the lower left side of the abdomen.

Transverse Colostomy—a surgical opening created in the transverse colon (the portion that goes across your body) resulting in one or two openings. It is located in the upper abdomen, middle or right side.

Ascending Colostomy—an opening in the ascending portion of the colon (the portion that goes up the right side of your body). It is located on the right side of the abdomen.

Loop Colostomy—usually created in the transverse colon. This is one stoma with two openings; one discharges stool, the second mucus.

Temporary Colostomy—it may have one or two openings (if two, one will discharge only mucus). Allows the lower portion of the colon to rest or heal. A temporary colostomy will be evaluated at some time to determine if the colon can be reattached (called a resection or reversal) or if the colostomy should become permanent.

Permanent Colostomy—usually involves the loss of part of the colon, most commonly the rectum. The end of the remaining portion of the colon is brought out to the abdominal wall to form the stoma.

 Ileostomy—An ileostomy is created when a lower portion of the small intestine, the ileum, is surgically brought through the abdominal wall to form a stoma. Ileostomies may be temporary or permanent and may involve removal of all or part of the entire colon.

 Urostomy—This is a general term for a surgical procedure which diverts urine away from a diseased or defective bladder. The most common urostomies are the ileal or cecal conduit procedures.

Ileal Conduit—in this procedure a section at the end of the small bowel (the ileum) is surgically removed and relocated as a passageway (conduit) for urine to pass from the kidneys to the outside of the body through a stoma. It may include removal of the diseased bladder. Another common name is the ileal loop.

Cecal Conduit—in this procedure a section at the beginning of the large intestine (the cecum) is surgically removed and relocated as a passageway (conduit) for urine to pass from the kidneys to the outside of the body through a stoma. It may include removal of the diseased bladder. Another common name is the colon conduit

 










FEBRUARY 2014
DATE:  WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014
TIME:  7:00 PM
PROGRAM:  SHARING
REFRESHMENTS:  ROSE TAYLOR & DONNA OSARIO

WHERE:  KAISER VALLEJO, 975 SERENO BLVD.

               MEETING ROOMS A & B

               FIRST FLOOR, LOOK FOR SIGNS.


The documents contained within this newsletter are presented expressly for informational purposes only.  In no way are any of the materials presented here meant to be a substitute for professional medical care  or attention by a qualified practitioner, nor should they be construed as such.  ALWAYS check with your doctor.

CHAPTER NOTES

Hollister was well represented by Shelley Goldblum at the January meeting.  She presented a number of new items and answered questions from the members that were able to attend this meeting. 

Due to illness our officers, and others, were not able to be there in body, but they were in spirit.

 

DUES ARE DUE IN FEBRUARY

We will be sending renewal letters out shortly.

 

Adhesions and Other Pains that Cramp Your Style

via UOAA Update, January 2014

Some people form adhesions, bands of tough, string-like fibrous tissue, more easily than others. Adhesions may form spontaneously but are more common after surgery.  If adhesions interfere with normal motion of the intestine, a blockage may occur, with food, liquid or even air unable

to pass the blocked area. Severe bloating, abdominal pain, vomiting and constipation may occur. In such a serious situation, call your doctor immediately.

In many cases the possibility of adhesions wrongly gets the blame for abdominal pain. A frequent cause for such pain is a spasm of the muscles responsible for peristalsis, which propels the “bolus” through the intestines. A muscle spasm in the calf is referred to as a “Charlie horse.” Spasms in your intestines are essentially the same thing but assume the name “irritable intestine.”

 

 

Shingles

UOAA Update, 1/2014 — Ostomoma News, Sonoma County, CA

If you have had chickenpox you are at risk for Shingles. It is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Once a person has had chickenpox, the virus can live, but remains inactive in certain nerve roots in the body for many years. If it becomes active again, usually later in life, it can cause Shingles. The risk of Shingles increases as you get older. These viruses can activate at any time, without warning. There is no way to tell who will get Shingles or when they may occur.

The first signs of Shingles are often felt and may not be seen. These can include itching, tingling or burning. A few days later a rash of fluid-filled blisters may appear (only on one side of the body or face). The blisters may take 2-4 weeks to heal. Shingles can be painful and can cause serious problems. For most people, the pain from the rash lessens as it heals. After the rash heals, however, Shingles may lead to pain that lasts for months or even years. This is because the virus can damage certain nerves. Other serious problems that may be caused by Shingles include skin infection, muscle weakness, scarring or decreased vision or hearing.

The older you get, the more at risk you are. This is because the body can’t defend itself against the virus as well as it could when you were younger. There is now a vaccine available to prevent Shingles. Everyone should get the vaccine — it’s worth it!!

 

 

Helping Family and Friends Understand Your Ostomy

by Edgepark Newsletter, December 2013 Edition

Talking to friends—and even family—about your ostomy may seem overwhelming at first. You might wonder where to begin the conversation and how much you need to explain. The best way to know how to answer questions about your ostomy is to think through how you want to respond beforehand. Here are a few ideas to consider when talking about your ostomy with others.

Practice what you’re going to say. If you’ve recently undergone surgery, people may wonder what happened, why you’ve been gone and if you’re feeling okay. Come up with a quick response that makes you feel comfortable. You can keep it simple. Decide what and how much you wish to say about your ostomy. Practicing this answer with a close friend or family member can make answering more comfortable and easier for you.

Understand how much the other person knows about ostomies. Think back—how much did you know about ostomies before your surgery? You may have never heard of an ostomy before. Chances are many of the people you encounter won’t know anything about an ostomy either. Keep this in mind as you consider what to say to individuals about your ostomy. You might want to review general information about how the digestive system works before getting into what kind of surgery you had. For example, you might want to say something along these lines, “Have you ever heard of an ostomy? People who have serious problems with their digestive system may need surgery like I had. With the surgery the doctor brings a portion of the colon (or small intestine for an ileostomy or urostomy) through the stomach muscles so it has an opening outside the body. I attach a plastic pouch with an adhesive to collect body waste.”

Emphasize how your ostomy has benefitted your life. During the conversation you may want to point out the benefits of having an ostomy. For instance, you may have undergone ostomy surgery to treat a chronic condition and now that the surgery is over, you feel healthier.

Connect with others who have ostomies. Reach out to others with ostomies for support. In online forums you can find information and stories about how people talked to friends, family, co-workers, dates and others about their ostomy. Reading their experiences may give you added confidence when it comes to answering questions about your ostomy.

Encourage people to find out more — on their own. Your friends and family will probably have many questions about your ostomy. They may not feel comfortable asking you every question. To help them answer their questions suggest they visit www.ostomy.org, the website of the United Ostomy Associations of America, Inc. to learn more.












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